Discussion:
For all you hams who are boaters...
(too old to reply)
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-19 22:38:32 UTC
Permalink
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.

I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.

Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Eisboch
2006-10-20 00:16:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.
I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.
I missed it. Woulda tried picking it up on the Grundig, but was busy
debugging this computer.
(successfully, it appears).

Oh ... thanks for posting those CG freqs. That will be fun to play with as
the weather gets colder.

Eisboch
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 00:38:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.
I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.
I missed it. Woulda tried picking it up on the Grundig, but was busy
debugging this computer. (successfully, it appears).
YAY!!! Worked a few Europeans and a new Russian prefix that caught me
by surprise. Japanese operators long path which surprised me -
normally 40 is a problem at this latitude at that time of night - it's
just 20 meters where they hang out.

I was very pleased with myself when the code speed came up to snuff.
I'm still 10 wpm short of 100% copy at 55 wpm which is my comfort zone
in sending - it will take a little time to get it back.

It should be fun operating off the boat this summer. The last time I
went Maritime Mobile in a UHF contest, I had pileups wanting both my
prefix and grid square.

And I need to concentrate on what the new boat is going to be. I'd
prefer to operate from a cabin rather than an open center console. :>)
Post by Eisboch
Oh ... thanks for posting those CG freqs. That will be fun to play with as
the weather gets colder.
They can be fun. Two winters ago, I was listening to USCG New Orleans
coordinating aircraft with USCG Houston looking for a fishing boat
that went astray.

----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Eisboch
2006-10-20 01:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.
I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.
I missed it. Woulda tried picking it up on the Grundig, but was busy
debugging this computer. (successfully, it appears).
YAY!!! Worked a few Europeans and a new Russian prefix that caught me
by surprise. Japanese operators long path which surprised me -
normally 40 is a problem at this latitude at that time of night - it's
just 20 meters where they hang out.
I was very pleased with myself when the code speed came up to snuff.
I'm still 10 wpm short of 100% copy at 55 wpm which is my comfort zone
in sending - it will take a little time to get it back.
It should be fun operating off the boat this summer. The last time I
went Maritime Mobile in a UHF contest, I had pileups wanting both my
prefix and grid square.
And I need to concentrate on what the new boat is going to be. I'd
prefer to operate from a cabin rather than an open center console. :>)
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.

Eisboch
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 01:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.
I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.
I missed it. Woulda tried picking it up on the Grundig, but was busy
debugging this computer. (successfully, it appears).
YAY!!! Worked a few Europeans and a new Russian prefix that caught me
by surprise. Japanese operators long path which surprised me -
normally 40 is a problem at this latitude at that time of night - it's
just 20 meters where they hang out.
I was very pleased with myself when the code speed came up to snuff.
I'm still 10 wpm short of 100% copy at 55 wpm which is my comfort zone
in sending - it will take a little time to get it back.
It should be fun operating off the boat this summer. The last time I
went Maritime Mobile in a UHF contest, I had pileups wanting both my
prefix and grid square.
And I need to concentrate on what the new boat is going to be. I'd
prefer to operate from a cabin rather than an open center console. :>)
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.

Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)

There are a couple of amateur cruising services on 20 meters - one
that operates from Germany and one from the UK that follow cruisers
all around the world. They give out wx forecasts, report on wx
conditions and all sorts of cruising coordination.

----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Eisboch
2006-10-20 01:34:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.
Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)
Listen? :-)

I learned code back in the Navy. It wasn't used much anymore, but we still
had to learn it. To pass the course we had to do 20 wpm minimum with no
more than 1 or two mistakes IIRC. I passed with 35 wpm.
Right now I doubt I could do the alphabet in 10 minutes and would still need
a book.

Eisboch
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 01:47:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.
Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)
Listen? :-)
I learned code back in the Navy. It wasn't used much anymore, but we still
had to learn it. To pass the course we had to do 20 wpm minimum with no
more than 1 or two mistakes IIRC. I passed with 35 wpm.
Right now I doubt I could do the alphabet in 10 minutes and would still need
a book.
It's funny - I learned as a kid and I don't think there was ever a
time that I couldn't keep up at 20 wpm. My mother was a USCG radio
operator during WWII and up until the day she kind of faded away, she
could copy solid at 30 wpm - it's was pretty amazing.

A lot of people don't know this, but learning the code, you've passed
the test. When you learn the code, it's actually at 5 wpm, a little
closer to 7 wpm actually.

Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.

In theory.

Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.

In Morse. :>)
Eisboch
2006-10-20 02:09:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.
In theory.
Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.
In Morse. :>)
One of my Navy sea tales:

During one of our patrols in the Med on a DE a radioman inadvertently
shredded the key codes for the crypto gear during a mid-watch. He didn't
fess up right away and therefore all codes had to be considered compromised.
(He finally admitted his guilt)

Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the old
seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and send
encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just to raise
somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could figure out how
to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out, but it was the first
and last time I ever had to do that).

The CO was not a happy camper.

Definitely dates me though. I don't think they even use HF anymore.

Eisboch
Larry
2006-10-20 04:07:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the
old seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and
send encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just
to raise somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could
figure out how to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out,
but it was the first and last time I ever had to do that).
USS Everglades (AD-24). Radio Two had two TBK, One TBL, 4 TCS, two AM
plate modulators for the TBKs, all running off racks of motor-generator
sets in the back compartment from old Ship's 110VDC power off the DC
steam generator that powered the winches and booms.

If I keyed both TBKs at full power, I could load the M-G sets enough to
actually drop our head pressure...(c;

You boys need CW or AM to shore on MF or HF, just let me know what freq.
After she's tuned up, it's best to keep your bare hands away from the
shrouds on the mast. Don't wanna see anybody get burned....(c; On some
freqs, they'd turn the air blue around the longwires at night in the wet.

Rock and Roll radio in Charleston was WTMA on 1250 Khz. My fav test freq
used to be 1253, which made a nice hi-pitched note on any radios on deck.

Antennas were long wires between the king post crossarms with a vertical
component down to big brown ceramic feedthroughs into Radio Two, aft
superstructure. Inside the transmitter shack, RF ran in a box trunk on
3/4" copper tubing, unbalanced to the antenna tuner atop the TBx
transmitters. On 4 Mhz, I could easily pin the antenna current meters
and had great reports from hams and Charleston Test Control on 2150 Khz,
even from half way to the Med.

Many times the old girls with the bright filaments had good signals
ashore when the new Collins AN/URC-32s sending 500W to their 35' whips
could barely be heard ashore or afloat. We had one FSK unit, I don't
remember the model, that would give one of the 3 big transmitters FSK
capability, fed by the crypto machines in Radio Central, KWR-7 and 37s.

BM deck techs were terrified of them after one BMSN took the grounding
strap off a turnbuckle to clog it with paint and got his hands burned.
They'd always call me, after that, to coordinate when they would be
properly secured with a working aloft chit.

After the transmitters were trashed by our pencil pusher RM teletype
operators, causing these old manually tuned transmitters grief, I made a
deal with the comm officer. I took over Radio 2 and had the ONLY key.
If he needed a freq I wasn't already up on during the night, they got me
out of my rack to retune in minutes.....instead of having to rebuild the
amps and clean out the melted tube parts for hours when his geniuses
changed freq and tuned some stage on the wrong multiplier setting....
(sigh)

Thanks for the memories.
Butler ET1 - (call us Glitter Delta)
Eisboch
2006-10-20 07:05:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Eisboch
Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the
old seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and
send encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just
to raise somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could
figure out how to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out,
but it was the first and last time I ever had to do that).
USS Everglades (AD-24). Radio Two had two TBK, One TBL, 4 TCS, two AM
plate modulators for the TBKs, all running off racks of motor-generator
sets in the back compartment from old Ship's 110VDC power off the DC
steam generator that powered the winches and booms.
Thanks for the memories.
Butler ET1 - (call us Glitter Delta)
I've long forgotten the transmitter types we had, but I think they were
similar to the ones you describe. I think the two older were 1kw versions
(exciter and intermediate power amp) of a shore based, 10kw AN/FRT-39
transmitter .... or something like that. It was a two rack monster standing
about 5-6 feet tall and mounted on rubber feet that allowed it to sway all
over the place. I forget now ... peak the grid and dip the plate? Or was
it the other way around? We also had a couple of more "modern" automatic
tuning transmitters but I can't remember what they were .... UCC-1?

Radio one and two? Ha. Our transmitter shop was about 8 feet wide by 14
feet long. Radio Central was one deck above and was about the same size.
Then there was an ancient emergency transmitter installed somewhere in the
stern that nobody paid any attention to. I was one of the few ET's in the
Navy that also had a Mod 28 teletype repair job code, so I was kept busy.
That job code was usually held by the RMs.
I was in from 1968 until 1977 and went through the warrant selection
program. Almost was forced to made it a career by continuing to accept
school opportunities, but thankfully bailed out when I had the chance.

Eisboch
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Larry
Post by Eisboch
Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the
old seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and
send encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just
to raise somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could
figure out how to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out,
but it was the first and last time I ever had to do that).
USS Everglades (AD-24). Radio Two had two TBK, One TBL, 4 TCS, two AM
plate modulators for the TBKs, all running off racks of motor-generator
sets in the back compartment from old Ship's 110VDC power off the DC
steam generator that powered the winches and booms.
Thanks for the memories.
Butler ET1 - (call us Glitter Delta)
I've long forgotten the transmitter types we had, but I think they were
similar to the ones you describe. I think the two older were 1kw versions
(exciter and intermediate power amp) of a shore based, 10kw AN/FRT-39
transmitter .... or something like that. It was a two rack monster standing
about 5-6 feet tall and mounted on rubber feet that allowed it to sway all
over the place. I forget now ... peak the grid and dip the plate? Or was
it the other way around? We also had a couple of more "modern" automatic
tuning transmitters but I can't remember what they were .... UCC-1?
Radio one and two? Ha. Our transmitter shop was about 8 feet wide by 14
feet long. Radio Central was one deck above and was about the same size.
Then there was an ancient emergency transmitter installed somewhere in the
stern that nobody paid any attention to. I was one of the few ET's in the
Navy that also had a Mod 28 teletype repair job code, so I was kept busy.
That job code was usually held by the RMs.
I was in from 1968 until 1977 and went through the warrant selection
program. Almost was forced to made it a career by continuing to accept
school opportunities, but thankfully bailed out when I had the chance.
Ah yes - TTY.

My Dad had one of those in his basement when I was still learning
basic radio electronics.

I can remember that thing pounding away when he talked to his buddies
who were still in the service and at sea.

Unreal.

----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 13:55:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Ah yes - TTY.
My Dad had one of those in his basement when I was still learning
basic radio electronics.
I can remember that thing pounding away when he talked to his buddies
who were still in the service and at sea.
Speaking of RTTY, I was the first legal ASCII station on ham radio in the
4th call district. A bunch of us ol teletypers, one in each call district,
were bound determined to be the first on ASCII and met on 14.110 Mhz in the
"Canadian Phone Band" for the event. 15 seconds before it was legal, we
started frantically calling CQ, all at once, on 110 baud ASCII for 60
seconds, making us number ones for our district. Before that event, hams
were only allowed to use 60 wpm BAUDOT teletype code because the government
bureaucrats wouldn't let us have any system they had no way of monitoring,
still afraid we were sending secret messages to U-boats and the Luftwaffe
offshore.
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 15:15:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Ah yes - TTY.
My Dad had one of those in his basement when I was still learning
basic radio electronics.
I can remember that thing pounding away when he talked to his buddies
who were still in the service and at sea.
Speaking of RTTY, I was the first legal ASCII station on ham radio in the
4th call district. A bunch of us ol teletypers, one in each call district,
were bound determined to be the first on ASCII and met on 14.110 Mhz in the
"Canadian Phone Band" for the event. 15 seconds before it was legal, we
started frantically calling CQ, all at once, on 110 baud ASCII for 60
seconds, making us number ones for our district. Before that event, hams
were only allowed to use 60 wpm BAUDOT teletype code because the government
bureaucrats wouldn't let us have any system they had no way of monitoring,
still afraid we were sending secret messages to U-boats and the Luftwaffe
offshore.
LOL!!!

I have German relatives who were hams before the war - had their
radios confiscated for much the same reason.

Like a German Uboat would ever show up in Lake Michigan. :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 18:52:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
LOL!!!
I have German relatives who were hams before the war - had their
radios confiscated for much the same reason.
Like a German Uboat would ever show up in Lake Michigan. :>)
All ham radio licenses were cancelled for the duration of the war. As a
matter of fact, most Americans don't know that you had to have your big
Zenith or RCA console MODIFIED by a radio technician, by force of law, so
you didn't listen to Lord Haw Haw or any of the other German shortwave
transmissions. This applied to Canadians, too, as I have some receipt
pictures on a disk somewhere showing the work had been done. There are
pictures of these receipts and notes inside old radios posted,
occasionally, to alt.binaries.pictures.radio newsgroup. The shortwave
bands had to be disconnected by a technician just to keep the American
public in the dark, isolated from the war.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 00:38:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
LOL!!!
I have German relatives who were hams before the war - had their
radios confiscated for much the same reason.
Like a German Uboat would ever show up in Lake Michigan. :>)
All ham radio licenses were cancelled for the duration of the war. As a
matter of fact, most Americans don't know that you had to have your big
Zenith or RCA console MODIFIED by a radio technician, by force of law, so
you didn't listen to Lord Haw Haw or any of the other German shortwave
transmissions. This applied to Canadians, too, as I have some receipt
pictures on a disk somewhere showing the work had been done. There are
pictures of these receipts and notes inside old radios posted,
occasionally, to alt.binaries.pictures.radio newsgroup. The shortwave
bands had to be disconnected by a technician just to keep the American
public in the dark, isolated from the war.
I remember reading about that, but never heard any stories about it.


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 13:50:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
I've long forgotten the transmitter types we had, but I think they
were similar to the ones you describe. I think the two older were 1kw
versions (exciter and intermediate power amp) of a shore based, 10kw
AN/FRT-39 transmitter .... or something like that. It was a two rack
monster standing about 5-6 feet tall and mounted on rubber feet that
allowed it to sway all over the place. I forget now ... peak the grid
and dip the plate? Or was it the other way around? We also had a
couple of more "modern" automatic tuning transmitters but I can't
remember what they were .... UCC-1?
The FRT's were much later. TB series transmitters were WW2! peak
grid/dip plate, load plate then redip because the load detuned
everything. The antenna coupling capacitor on a TBK was two cast
aluminum round pieces that screwed in and out from each other with round
plates that meshed, but didn't touch of course. St Elmo's fire would
cause them to flashover, some times...(c;

I fixed "a few" UCC-1s in my day....yecch. I also worked on the
transmitter/receivers after the TB/RB series, the SRT/SRA series. I was
involved with some of the best (and most profitable) field changes that
came from benny suggs George Raines, an MIT engineer classmate of mine
who refused a commission, and I generated while in "A" school's
accelerated program. George couldn't open a tech manual without pointing
out some stupid error or better way of designing some circuit. He did
the engineering, then I'd build it in the school's shop to submit in our
detailed report with our benny sug...(c;
Post by Eisboch
Radio one and two? Ha. Our transmitter shop was about 8 feet wide by
14 feet long. Radio Central was one deck above and was about the same
size. Then there was an ancient emergency transmitter installed
somewhere in the stern that nobody paid any attention to. I was one
of the few ET's in the Navy that also had a Mod 28 teletype repair job
code, so I was kept busy. That job code was usually held by the RMs.
I was in from 1968 until 1977 and went through the warrant selection
program. Almost was forced to made it a career by continuing to accept
school opportunities, but thankfully bailed out when I had the chance.
Everglades, a destroyer tender, was quite large. We were just a portable
shipyard. We even had an electric foundery and could make about anything
any machine part could need. Our electric shop had a full motor rewind
shop. Our main ET shop had 12 ETs. I was an ET-1598 cal tech
(metrologist) in Fleet Cal Lab designator EAT for nearly 4 years. Glades
was started at the end of WW2 but abandoned as the war ended and not
completed until 1952 to serve in Korea. She spent Vietnam, when I was
aboard her, in Charleston with Med cruises to service 6th Fleet cans and
to do Yellowstone's work for her in Mayport, FL.

Our TTY shop had two RM1s with all the schools, just aft of my cal lab.
My 28KSR used for press copy in the cal lab, posted every morning on the
mess decks bulletin board, was built from spare parts in that shop. I
had a stolen R-390A, homebrew rtty modem and that TTY machine running
24/7 in the cal lab storeroom so we didn't have to listen to the noise...
(c;

My Navy tour was from '64 to '71. Nothing heroic, I joined the Navy for
ET schools and to avoid being forced to Vietnam to die for nothing by the
War corporations. Glades was a great place we all hid in on the other
side of the planet. In '71, with the war winding down before politicians
were strung from light poles, we were 'encouraged' to leave. One of our
chiefs was refused reenlistment at 18 years service to keep from paying
him a retirement check and medical benefits from being exposed to
chemical warfare in 'Nam. He was forced out and lots of the rest of us,
traumatized by Navy's treatment of him, figured it was best to leave.

I got even and became a contractor....(c;
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:51:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Eisboch
Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the
old seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and
send encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just
to raise somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could
figure out how to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out,
but it was the first and last time I ever had to do that).
USS Everglades (AD-24). Radio Two had two TBK, One TBL, 4 TCS, two AM
plate modulators for the TBKs, all running off racks of motor-generator
sets in the back compartment from old Ship's 110VDC power off the DC
steam generator that powered the winches and booms.
If I keyed both TBKs at full power, I could load the M-G sets enough to
actually drop our head pressure...(c;
I envy you Navy radio guys - Sometimes I wish I had taken a different
path in the military - I would have loved to play with that stuff.

Speaking of Collins, I have my Dad's S-line and his KWM-2 "mobile"
transceiver which was a civilian version of a Navy aircraft
transceiver.

He used to take the KWM out on his boat and run MM with a homemade
Rube Goldberg antenna which his buddy concocted out of aircraft
tubing. I swear to you (and this is my memory here, so it's suspect)
it looked exactly like a very early version of the Butternut HF-6
vertical. :>)

I'd have to go down to the radio shack in the barn and riffle through
my QSL cards, but I have a couple of Navy submarine contacts - one is
a nuke - a 680 attack sub. One of those sub QSOs was underwater which
I thought, at the time, wasn't possible, but I actually talked to the
guy who made the QSO and he confirmed it was underwater.

I don't know how they defined "underwater". :>)

----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 13:58:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Speaking of Collins, I have my Dad's S-line and his KWM-2 "mobile"
transceiver which was a civilian version of a Navy aircraft
transceiver.
KWM-2 was a ham rig the military adopted as the KWM-2A, which had a crystal
pack and an extra row of local oscillator crystals you could switch to to
operate out of the ham bands on other 500 Khz bandspreads. I had a
suitcase radio KWM-2A, full crystal pack, Samsonite suitcase made for it,
pull out long steel tape dipole calibrated in Mhz, with portable PM-2 power
supply that plugged neatly into the back of the KWM-2A that came from
Vietnam where they threw away thousands of them to try to help Collins and
later Rockwell get rich. They were great transceivers and very portable
for their day. Just carry it with your own suitcase....(c;
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 15:13:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Speaking of Collins, I have my Dad's S-line and his KWM-2 "mobile"
transceiver which was a civilian version of a Navy aircraft
transceiver.
KWM-2 was a ham rig the military adopted as the KWM-2A, which had a crystal
pack and an extra row of local oscillator crystals you could switch to to
operate out of the ham bands on other 500 Khz bandspreads. I had a
suitcase radio KWM-2A, full crystal pack, Samsonite suitcase made for it,
pull out long steel tape dipole calibrated in Mhz, with portable PM-2 power
supply that plugged neatly into the back of the KWM-2A that came from
Vietnam where they threw away thousands of them to try to help Collins and
later Rockwell get rich. They were great transceivers and very portable
for their day. Just carry it with your own suitcase....(c;
I used to use the KWM-2A all the time - on the sly - on the ham bands
when things were slow in 'Nam. :>)

They just don't make them like they used to.


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 19:44:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I used to use the KWM-2A all the time - on the sly - on the ham bands
when things were slow in 'Nam. :>)
I was the only ham radio operator on USS Everglades for my tour. Call
was WB4THE at the time. My ham radio was the crew's telephone home with
an old friend of mine, Cliff, K4OKD, back on James Island in Charleston.
He ran phone patches for lots of sailors whos ships were at sea out of
our port. His wall was covered with ships' plaques he collected and
letters of thanks from greatful crews.

The comm officers hated me. My captain, a full 4-striper who made rear
admiral, used to terrify the Ensigns and JGs by going into Radio and
saying, "I want to talk to Charleston.", as we approached the Med or some
Caribbean islands. Of course, they'd have to tell him that wasn't
possible in these conditions, to which my captain would reply, "That's
bullshit! I've been talking to my wife on a phone patch from ET1
Butler's little Heathkit radio back in the cal lab for the last
hour!"....(c; Yep, comm officers hated me. With CRUDESFLOT6, our
admiral and my captain using my phone patch to call the wife, my ham
radio station was quite secure in its position of the pecking order. My
own EMO, a little weasle of a CWO2 Navy stuck us with, was always trying
to sabotage WB4THE/MM2. One time, he made the mistake of telling
CRUDESFLOT6 what a terrible security risk it was. He never pulled that
stunt, again, and was told the station would be still there after his
transfer to the Aleutians to run some remote walkie talkie....(c;
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
They just don't make them like they used to.
Thank God for that! I'm kinda partial to my FT-990/FT-900/Tentec
modified 650W (OUTPUT) Hercules II 12V linear toys, now. It only draws
120A at full power...(c;

Before I became an internet addict, my 1973 Mercedes 220D, the finest, NO
RF NOISE, diesel mobile on the planet sported a trunk remoted Yaesu FT-
900 next to the big Tentec linear and 2 330AH golf cart monsters in the
trunk. The linear and radio control heads were on a gooseneck stalk
conveniently located right under your hand next to the steering wheel.
Under the dash, fed by an old Win 3.1 laptop was a Kantronics KAM multi-
mode TNC for packet, RTTY, etc., with full crossband, MOBILE, high
powered VHF-HF node. Antenna was a home brewed 15' tall Texas Bugcatcher
with Henry Allen's biggest monster coil 3' off the trailer hitch military
insulator. 4' of stainless rod sat atop the big coil ending in an 8-
spoke, 18" diameter capacitor hat made of stainless welding rods welded
to two stainless flatwashers. Atop the capacitor hat was a cut-down
stainless CB whip up to around 15'. As 20M mobile was my favorite band,
the big coil shorting strap for this band would short out the entire coil
and the top whip was trimmed for 1:1 with no coils at 14.200 Mhz. At the
band edges it was only 1.3:1 and the big linear loved it, dearly.

To match the 12.8ohm base impedance, a large Amidon toroid from the
Wireman's HF balun kit was wound with 10 turns of #10 bare copper wire
over several layers of fiberglass insulation wrapped around the core. At
the ends and and at the outside of each turn, was soldered a banana jack
that was exposed on the outside of the plastic budbox it was all mounted
in to keep it out of the weather. One end of the autotransformer was
hard grounded to the Mercedes' frame directly under the whip with a heavy
strap. The shield of the feedline coax was also soldered to the strap.
The center conductor of the feedline had a big banana plug and was,
normally, plugged into the high end tap of the 10 turn coil (except on
10M where it was plugged into turn 6). A heavy strap to a big lug under
the whip's mount was the "tap" that plugged into turn 3 (20-10M) or 4
(40-80M) on the broadband autotransformer at the feedpoint. I melted a
couple of banana plugs until I found one that didn't mind conducting so
much current at such a low Z point...(c; The coil was always too hot to
touch and had to be isolated so it didn't touch the plastic box or it
would melt through it.

NOONE had more field strength from any mobile, or any more signal at a
remote point, running the same input power. I still have it, stored.

For 160 Meter mobile operation, a second autotransformer was wound with
22 turns tapped at 8 turns to match the base impedance at that band. A
second Henry Allen coil, about 40T of #14? was added atop the big monster
coil to tune it. Using the tap on the big coil, I could tune it all the
way across 1.8-2.0 easily, but its bandwidth was only about 12 Khz to the
2:1 SWR points, nearly like a cavity!

For 10M and 12M operation, the capacitor hat and 4' stainless rod above
the big coil quick disconnected and you put the CB whip on top of the big
coil. This tuned 10M with about 2 T of big coil unshorted and 12M with
2.5T unshorted, still making a big signal in Asia.

This installation had a big problem.....CORONA....especially on 160M and
80M. The ends of the capacitor hat rods were bent into a large hook and
they STILL blazed away, even in sunlight, as did the top of the CB whip.
Adding a big static ball to the CB whip top didn't help reduce the corona
spraying off it much at all. Estimating the length of the visible corona
and the humidity at measurement time, we estimated I was creating around
180 to 250KV at the top with a 650W carrier. "HEY, MISTER! YOUR ANTENNA
IS ON FIRE!!", they'd shout to me driving down the road....(c; The old
Mercedes electrical system is resonant on the upper end of 75M, too. AS
you talked to someone on 75M phone, all the dashlights would glow
brightly following your voice. On 75 and 160M phone, you could also hear
what anyone was saying into the microphone OUTSIDE the car because you
could hear the donald duck SSB IN THE CORONA at the top of the beast!

Great fun at a hamfest. I had custom-made warning signs: DANGER RF
RADIATION HAZARD - EVEN WHEN CAR IS UNOCCUPIED all around the big coil
because we used to leave the 20M packet crossband node running to 2 meter
packet from a 50W 2M FM rig to connect 2M packet hams to 20M packet hams.
This created storms of 2M packet QSOs wherever the car happened to be,
once the word got around. I used to leave the car on "Network 105" on
14.105 Mhz to the local packet VHF node wherever it was. Inside the
hamfest, I'd run a Tiny 2 little packet VHF TNC with a tiny VHF walkie
and a little Radio Shack LCD word processor that doubled as a dumb
terminal. Running 50mw from your flea market table, you could work Japan
on 20M packet....(c; Of course, some stupids got their fingers singed
out in the parking lot ignoring my warning signs, crossing the no-mans-
zone around the back of the car taped off with those lane markers they
use at the banks. They just HAD to burn themselves to prove me wrong!...
(c; You also got burned if you touched the body of the car (becoming
part of my ground plane array) below 20 meters. The car body was quite a
few hundred volts off ground-ground, especially the lower in frequency
you got. If you stuck your arm out the window and someone whistled on
160 meters, you could feel your fingers buzzing....

I still have it all, except the batteries of course. The antenna is
stored in my shed, the linear and FT-900 are in their boxes inside. I
don't even have an external antenna up at home for the last couple of
years. Who needs ham radio? I got Skype and Echolink.

It was a great ride for many years I spent on the road working gov't
contracts for the Navy....

Remember - POWER is our FRIEND!
Eisboch
2006-10-20 20:59:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I used to use the KWM-2A all the time - on the sly - on the ham bands
when things were slow in 'Nam. :>)
I was the only ham radio operator on USS Everglades for my tour. Call
was WB4THE at the time. My ham radio was the crew's telephone home with
an old friend of mine, Cliff, K4OKD, back on James Island in Charleston.
He ran phone patches for lots of sailors whos ships were at sea out of
our port. His wall was covered with ships' plaques he collected and
letters of thanks from greatful crews.
The comm officers hated me. My captain, a full 4-striper who made rear
admiral, used to terrify the Ensigns and JGs by going into Radio and
saying, "I want to talk to Charleston.", as we approached the Med or some
Caribbean islands. Of course, they'd have to tell him that wasn't
possible in these conditions, to which my captain would reply, "That's
bullshit! I've been talking to my wife on a phone patch from ET1
Butler's little Heathkit radio back in the cal lab for the last
hour!"....(c; Yep, comm officers hated me. With CRUDESFLOT6, our
admiral and my captain using my phone patch to call the wife, my ham
radio station was quite secure in its position of the pecking order. My
own EMO, a little weasle of a CWO2 Navy stuck us with, was always trying
to sabotage WB4THE/MM2. One time, he made the mistake of telling
CRUDESFLOT6 what a terrible security risk it was. He never pulled that
stunt, again, and was told the station would be still there after his
transfer to the Aleutians to run some remote walkie talkie....(c;
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
They just don't make them like they used to.
Thank God for that! I'm kinda partial to my FT-990/FT-900/Tentec
modified 650W (OUTPUT) Hercules II 12V linear toys, now. It only draws
120A at full power...(c;
Before I became an internet addict, my 1973 Mercedes 220D, the finest, NO
RF NOISE, diesel mobile on the planet sported a trunk remoted Yaesu FT-
900 next to the big Tentec linear and 2 330AH golf cart monsters in the
trunk. The linear and radio control heads were on a gooseneck stalk
conveniently located right under your hand next to the steering wheel.
Under the dash, fed by an old Win 3.1 laptop was a Kantronics KAM multi-
mode TNC for packet, RTTY, etc., with full crossband, MOBILE, high
powered VHF-HF node. Antenna was a home brewed 15' tall Texas Bugcatcher
with Henry Allen's biggest monster coil 3' off the trailer hitch military
insulator. 4' of stainless rod sat atop the big coil ending in an 8-
spoke, 18" diameter capacitor hat made of stainless welding rods welded
to two stainless flatwashers. Atop the capacitor hat was a cut-down
stainless CB whip up to around 15'. As 20M mobile was my favorite band,
the big coil shorting strap for this band would short out the entire coil
and the top whip was trimmed for 1:1 with no coils at 14.200 Mhz. At the
band edges it was only 1.3:1 and the big linear loved it, dearly.
To match the 12.8ohm base impedance, a large Amidon toroid from the
Wireman's HF balun kit was wound with 10 turns of #10 bare copper wire
over several layers of fiberglass insulation wrapped around the core. At
the ends and and at the outside of each turn, was soldered a banana jack
that was exposed on the outside of the plastic budbox it was all mounted
in to keep it out of the weather. One end of the autotransformer was
hard grounded to the Mercedes' frame directly under the whip with a heavy
strap. The shield of the feedline coax was also soldered to the strap.
The center conductor of the feedline had a big banana plug and was,
normally, plugged into the high end tap of the 10 turn coil (except on
10M where it was plugged into turn 6). A heavy strap to a big lug under
the whip's mount was the "tap" that plugged into turn 3 (20-10M) or 4
(40-80M) on the broadband autotransformer at the feedpoint. I melted a
couple of banana plugs until I found one that didn't mind conducting so
much current at such a low Z point...(c; The coil was always too hot to
touch and had to be isolated so it didn't touch the plastic box or it
would melt through it.
NOONE had more field strength from any mobile, or any more signal at a
remote point, running the same input power. I still have it, stored.
For 160 Meter mobile operation, a second autotransformer was wound with
22 turns tapped at 8 turns to match the base impedance at that band. A
second Henry Allen coil, about 40T of #14? was added atop the big monster
coil to tune it. Using the tap on the big coil, I could tune it all the
way across 1.8-2.0 easily, but its bandwidth was only about 12 Khz to the
2:1 SWR points, nearly like a cavity!
For 10M and 12M operation, the capacitor hat and 4' stainless rod above
the big coil quick disconnected and you put the CB whip on top of the big
coil. This tuned 10M with about 2 T of big coil unshorted and 12M with
2.5T unshorted, still making a big signal in Asia.
This installation had a big problem.....CORONA....especially on 160M and
80M. The ends of the capacitor hat rods were bent into a large hook and
they STILL blazed away, even in sunlight, as did the top of the CB whip.
Adding a big static ball to the CB whip top didn't help reduce the corona
spraying off it much at all. Estimating the length of the visible corona
and the humidity at measurement time, we estimated I was creating around
180 to 250KV at the top with a 650W carrier. "HEY, MISTER! YOUR ANTENNA
IS ON FIRE!!", they'd shout to me driving down the road....(c; The old
Mercedes electrical system is resonant on the upper end of 75M, too. AS
you talked to someone on 75M phone, all the dashlights would glow
brightly following your voice. On 75 and 160M phone, you could also hear
what anyone was saying into the microphone OUTSIDE the car because you
could hear the donald duck SSB IN THE CORONA at the top of the beast!
Great fun at a hamfest. I had custom-made warning signs: DANGER RF
RADIATION HAZARD - EVEN WHEN CAR IS UNOCCUPIED all around the big coil
because we used to leave the 20M packet crossband node running to 2 meter
packet from a 50W 2M FM rig to connect 2M packet hams to 20M packet hams.
This created storms of 2M packet QSOs wherever the car happened to be,
once the word got around. I used to leave the car on "Network 105" on
14.105 Mhz to the local packet VHF node wherever it was. Inside the
hamfest, I'd run a Tiny 2 little packet VHF TNC with a tiny VHF walkie
and a little Radio Shack LCD word processor that doubled as a dumb
terminal. Running 50mw from your flea market table, you could work Japan
on 20M packet....(c; Of course, some stupids got their fingers singed
out in the parking lot ignoring my warning signs, crossing the no-mans-
zone around the back of the car taped off with those lane markers they
use at the banks. They just HAD to burn themselves to prove me wrong!...
(c; You also got burned if you touched the body of the car (becoming
part of my ground plane array) below 20 meters. The car body was quite a
few hundred volts off ground-ground, especially the lower in frequency
you got. If you stuck your arm out the window and someone whistled on
160 meters, you could feel your fingers buzzing....
I still have it all, except the batteries of course. The antenna is
stored in my shed, the linear and FT-900 are in their boxes inside. I
don't even have an external antenna up at home for the last couple of
years. Who needs ham radio? I got Skype and Echolink.
It was a great ride for many years I spent on the road working gov't
contracts for the Navy....
Remember - POWER is our FRIEND!
Fun reading Larry .... that's why I didn't snip a thing. But just think.
All of us ancient day radio nerds have been replaced by cell phones the
Internet and iPods. A shame in a way ... electronics and radio is a great
hobby.

Eisboch
Larry
2006-10-21 00:43:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Fun reading Larry .... that's why I didn't snip a thing. But just
think. All of us ancient day radio nerds have been replaced by cell
phones the Internet and iPods. A shame in a way ... electronics and
radio is a great hobby.
Eisboch
Anyone can just stop by any Radio Shack and see how very true that
statement is.... You can hardly find a fuse at Ratshack any more. The big
warehouse Ratshack closed and I think half of it is in my shed...(c; I
have a lifetime supply of #2, 4 and 8 fine stranded black and red power
cables I got out of a truck full of boxed cables and wound on spools,
including miles of Ratshack's nice #10 speaker cable zipcord. AT the
current price of copper, it's worth more than my truck!

Let's not make me sick saying "Ipod". Let's say MP3 players. Ah, that's
better. Ipods suck but are expertly marketed....
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 00:59:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Fun reading Larry .... that's why I didn't snip a thing. But just think.
All of us ancient day radio nerds have been replaced by cell phones the
Internet and iPods. A shame in a way ... electronics and radio is a great
hobby.
Sad ain't it?

I mean, none of these kids will ever know the excitement of loading up
a 100 watt light bulb as a dummy load and working a ham 100 miles away
by accident. :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-21 14:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I mean, none of these kids will ever know the excitement of loading up
a 100 watt light bulb as a dummy load and working a ham 100 miles away
by accident. :>)
None of them will have the experience of holding a lit 40W flourescent tube
standing in the beam path of my '67 VW campmobile's stacked 4-element 2M
Cushcrafts fed with the modified Gonset power amp's 4CX250B running 800W on
2M FM, back when there was ONE repeater over a hundred miles
away....either. We figured around 9 to 10KW ERP....Troposcatter anyone?

I worked a guy in Arizona on 146.52 simplex from the top of Paris Mountain
in Greenville, SC, with it...(c; He was running his moonbounce station
around 30KW ERP at the time...4 stacked KLM 15 element yagis and a kilowatt
GE FM amp. Nice station for 2M.

The Gonset had a 4X150 in it when I got it. We built it a voltage doubler
to raise the plate up for the 250B and put newfangled silicon transistors
in the power switcher for more amps. Man that was a nice amp....useless
today.
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 00:58:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Remember - POWER is our FRIEND!
Damn straight. :>)

Currently, my shack consists of a FT-1000 D with the narrow filters,
Henry 2KD amp highly modified, a FT-900 as a back up radio with
external DSP, KAM, computer and key. I keep the microphone in the
drawer.

Antenna farm is also pretty simple - Vertical 2m, R3 for listening on
the house, TH-11 @ 105 feet, two fixed 20 monobanders one at 60 feet
and one at 90 feet, a true Beverage out through the woods for low
bands (1600 feet) and two G5RVs NW/SE and NE/SW @ 60 feet.

Back in the day though.. :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-21 14:17:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Henry 2KD amp highly modified
Mr Henry made some really nice amps. I had a Collins 30S-1 for a while
until some ham in Georgia wanted it so bad he met my I-don't-really-want-
to-sell-it price I figured I'd never get. Don'tcha love hams with money?

I built a homebrew back in the 70's when an unlimited supply of 4-1000A
tetrodes became available from a broadcast biz run by a friend. Lots of
stations were converting to ceramic tubes in those days.

The amp was in a WW2 Navy M series rack that was about 7' high and 24"
wide. Power supply was a 7200V, 5KVA pole pig running off the output of
a 30A, 240VAC Variac marked "Plate Kilovolts" to match the 270 degree GE
monster meters up on the power amp module. A pair of 6080 power tubes
provided a nicely regulated screen power supply because, unlike most hams
that hook them up in grounded grid for simplicity, I was bound to use
them as they were intended, tetrode AB1, common cathode. A regulated
fixed grid bias supply had a front panel control marked "IDLE CURRENT".
The grid input circuit was a 200 watt carbon pile of resistors at 52
ohms, cooled by the fan pressurizing the chassis of the power amp module,
which blew up through the two 4-1000A proper airflow sockets into their
nice chimneys....all very commercial quality. A screen-shielded window
in the front of the amp module let you watch the pair of 4-1000As in
action.

Filament current for two tubes meant unwinding the secondaries off a big
240VAC primary transformer and winding my own to provide that much stable
current. A security keyswitch on the front panel and two 240VAC air
conditioner contactors provided primary power control. Coaxial relays on
the amp provided antenna changeover control. There was even an antenna
selection rotary relay with 6 outputs selectable from the front panel of
the amp. My favorite antenna was a 75 meter full wave loop strung
horizontally between 4 perfectly-place oak trees in my neighbor's pasture
he kept horses in next door, one of the trees right over my hamshack.

The power amp had a WW2 Navy rotary inductor with front panel turns
counter. The coil was square conductor about 1/8" square cross section
an about 8" in diameter. I never had it on 160M, but it would tune down
to the top of the AM broadcast band, easily. Plate tuning cap of this
shunt-fed pi output matching was a 30KV, 30A, 1500pf vacuum variable.
Output cap was an open air beast in 2 sections that came out of the
antenna tuning unit of a 5KW AM station that went dark, as did my
rectifier stack and filter chokes. Fed up with blowing the coupling
capacitor from the plates to the output pi, a rather large .01uf, 30A,
15KV broadcast ceramic cap was refitted. The others I had melted, not
flashed over...(c;

Of course, all this was overkill running it at 1KW on the ham bands, even
100% duty cycle on 20M RTTY for hours on end. I'm not a real math wiz
when it comes to calculating plate power, especially in the heat of
workin' some rare DX on a Pacific island that only is out of the water at
low tide, hmm.....950ma, 6200VDC....lessee....yeah, that's pretty close
to a kilowatt in, right?....(c; Hearing the 5KVA power transformer that
ran THREE houses buzzing away when it was on the air, I called the stupid
rural electric coop to warn them before it exploded. They poo-pooed my
request for more amps, but became believers when I blew the bottom out of
the transformer, setting an oil fire that burned up the whole pole to the
ground! A new pole and 15KVA beast seemed to cure the problem. I told
them my neighbor had a new hot water heater...(c;

You could get about 3500 W out of it with 10 watts of drive into the grid
dummy load resistor. It was so high gain I added a "volume control" pot
marked "GRID DRIVE" so you could turn the input power up to a more easily
manageable level for a 100W transceiver, then adjust the drive to what
you needed...minimum power, of course....and that prevented those
impressive flashovers unwanted modulation peaks created when you were
trying NOT to overdrive it running 10W from a 100W radio.

The crowning moment was when I came into the local ham club meeting with
a 2' section of completely melted RG-8 coax soon after building it. You
could see the smile on my face miles away...(c; One of our members was
chief engineer of another AM station that had an end-fed halfwave on 1220
Khz. He used RG-17A/U to feed it at that high voltage and gave me a few
hundred feet of 17A claiming I couldn't melt it. He was right...

About 10 years later, I moved to smaller quarters in Florida and sold
that amp to a North Carolina CBer who had been drooling over it for years
for $3500. I gave him 8 sets of 4-1000As in the deal, knowing he was
going to blow them trying to be king of the hill on CB...(c;

That was my last big amp....The next amp I had was the best one ever
made, a National NCL-2000 2KW desk amp with a pair of 8122 ceramic
tetrodes from RCA hooked up, also, as proper tetrode amps, common
cathode. Hams never learned how to properly tune them for SCREEN
CURRENT, not plate current, and blew lots of 8122s in the process.
Properly tuned, a desktop NCL2000 was has loud as a Collins or Henry
floor amp and would also operate on RTTY for hours without exploding at a
kilowatt. I've kicked myself ever since for selling it to W4ZMZ, a
Baptist preacher who lost the amp in a fire. What a waste....(snif)

Carrier on my signal? No problem.......(c; I used to tell them I was
rotating my 75M tower array around as I cranked up the big variac with my
foot. "How's that? Can you hear me over his carrier, now?", I'd ask.
My buddy a hundred miles away said I was the only one on the air that
could pin the S-meter on his Collins 75S3-B...
ACP
2006-10-21 15:32:59 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Larry
Of course, all this was overkill running it at 1KW on the ham bands, even
100% duty cycle on 20M RTTY for hours on end. I'm not a real math wiz
when it comes to calculating plate power, especially in the heat of
workin' some rare DX on a Pacific island that only is out of the water at
low tide, hmm.....950ma, 6200VDC....lessee....yeah, that's pretty close
to a kilowatt in, right?....(c; Hearing the 5KVA power transformer that
ran THREE houses buzzing away when it was on the air, I called the stupid
rural electric coop to warn them before it exploded. They poo-pooed my
request for more amps, but became believers when I blew the bottom out of
the transformer, setting an oil fire that burned up the whole pole to the
ground! A new pole and 15KVA beast seemed to cure the problem. I told
them my neighbor had a new hot water heater...(c;
<snip>

Yes, but isn't increasing the input power from 1KW to 6KW, disregarding
inefficiencies, only about 8dB signal increase?
Larry
2006-10-21 21:39:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by ACP
Yes, but isn't increasing the input power from 1KW to 6KW, disregarding
inefficiencies, only about 8dB signal increase?
Yep. An 1KW is only 10 db above 100 watts and 20 db above 10 watts.....

8 db is a lot if it's 6 db above the NOISE FLOOR....(c;

Power is STILL our friend....Ask WSB, etc.
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Larry
2006-10-21 14:20:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
a true Beverage out through the woods for low
bands (1600 feet)
I built a 20 meter Rhombic out across a farm one time, pointed at the S
Pacific. It worked fantastic, but you couldn't keep it aloft for long in
the storms. It also was a great "etherial power source". Any thunderstorm
within 10 miles would induce amazing voltages on its wires!

Can you say "EMP", without cursing this time?
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Don White
2006-10-20 14:01:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Take it to Oprah!
Larry
2006-10-20 14:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I swear to you (and this is my memory here, so it's suspect)
it looked exactly like a very early version of the Butternut HF-6
vertical. :>)
On my wall over the computer is my RTTY roundup award, a SC record that
still stands, 6th place on the planet in 1994. Station was a Yaesu FT-990,
Drake L-4B linear and Butternut HF-9VX crazy looking vertical mounted in
the center of my metal mobile home ground plane. VE8RCS, the northern most
permanent amateur radio station on the planet, sent me a QSL saying that
Butternut was the loudest 20M RTTY station he could hear over the din of
the Japanese stations. Metal ground planes make a Butternut just hum!

WA4USN, the club station aboard the Aircraft Carrier Yorktown (CV-10) in
Charleston Harbor, uses a Butternut HF-6V bolted to the handrail of the
"World's Largest Ground Plane". Man, that thing radiates like mad!...(c;
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 15:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I swear to you (and this is my memory here, so it's suspect)
it looked exactly like a very early version of the Butternut HF-6
vertical. :>)
On my wall over the computer is my RTTY roundup award, a SC record that
still stands, 6th place on the planet in 1994. Station was a Yaesu FT-990,
Drake L-4B linear and Butternut HF-9VX crazy looking vertical mounted in
the center of my metal mobile home ground plane. VE8RCS, the northern most
permanent amateur radio station on the planet, sent me a QSL saying that
Butternut was the loudest 20M RTTY station he could hear over the din of
the Japanese stations. Metal ground planes make a Butternut just hum!
Tell me about it.

One of my fishing buds used to work for Victory Lines and ran a
retro-fitted Onasis era 750' tanker on a race track Baltimore to
Caracas to Houston to Baltimore and he had one of those Butternuts
clamped to the maneuvering side rail on the bridge.

I went with him one time on the Baltimore to Caracas portion of his
trip and worked anywhere I wanted on a barefoot TS-430 Kenwood, any
mode - always received the comment - "Man that's loud". :>)
Post by Larry
WA4USN, the club station aboard the Aircraft Carrier Yorktown (CV-10) in
Charleston Harbor, uses a Butternut HF-6V bolted to the handrail of the
"World's Largest Ground Plane". Man, that thing radiates like mad!...(c;
I had to look that one up in the log, but I've worked them several
times - comment is always "loud". :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 19:50:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
One of my fishing buds used to work for Victory Lines and ran a
retro-fitted Onasis era 750' tanker on a race track Baltimore to
Caracas to Houston to Baltimore and he had one of those Butternuts
clamped to the maneuvering side rail on the bridge.
One of the hams passing through Charleston from time to time was Larry,
KI7GF, who was one of the masters of SeaLand "Performance", a Dutch-made
950' containership I got the golden tour of. (7 cyl, 38,800hp, ONE
engine, no transmission, ONE BIG HONKIN' SCREW!)

Larry used a Butternut rigged to the top of the bridge with the Yaesu rig
on his desk in the master's stateroom. Worked great and I set him up on
packet/APRS many, many years ago. I've lost track of him, now, but used
to track him on 20M APRS unless he was chatting away on the phone bands.

The first time I was in his stateroom, I had to use the head. When I
came out of the captain's private head, I had an amused look on my face.
He asked me what was so funny. I said, "I'm an old enlisted sailor. Do
you know what they would have done to me if they'd caught me coming out
of the captain's head?!" Then he told me he was enlisted, too, when he
was in the Navy. Too funny....
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:52:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.
In theory.
Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.
In Morse. :>)
During one of our patrols in the Med on a DE a radioman inadvertently
shredded the key codes for the crypto gear during a mid-watch. He didn't
fess up right away and therefore all codes had to be considered compromised.
(He finally admitted his guilt)
Meanwhile, they couldn't use the secure HF TTY, so they rousted the old
seasoned Radioman Chief out of his rack and he had to set up and send
encrypted CW for about 4 hours. It took him at least an hour just to raise
somebody. I was dragged out of my rack because nobody could figure out how
to set the transmitter up for CW. (I figured it out, but it was the first
and last time I ever had to do that).
The CO was not a happy camper.
Definitely dates me though. I don't think they even use HF anymore.
Don't know, but I suspect they still have HF transmitters buried
somewhere on those ships.
Calif Bill
2006-10-20 03:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.
Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)
Listen? :-)
I learned code back in the Navy. It wasn't used much anymore, but we still
had to learn it. To pass the course we had to do 20 wpm minimum with no
more than 1 or two mistakes IIRC. I passed with 35 wpm.
Right now I doubt I could do the alphabet in 10 minutes and would still need
a book.
It's funny - I learned as a kid and I don't think there was ever a
time that I couldn't keep up at 20 wpm. My mother was a USCG radio
operator during WWII and up until the day she kind of faded away, she
could copy solid at 30 wpm - it's was pretty amazing.
A lot of people don't know this, but learning the code, you've passed
the test. When you learn the code, it's actually at 5 wpm, a little
closer to 7 wpm actually.
Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.
In theory.
Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.
In Morse. :>)
The ground nav aids for aircraft sent their ID in morse, and the pilots were
expected to copy 5 wpm. We sent at, I think, 3 wpm. I just looked at the
tabs in the equipment to see if we sent the proper codes. This was for
TACAN, LORAN, ILS systems. This was 1965 and I expect they still use morse
to ID.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:34:36 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 03:59:26 GMT, "Calif Bill"
Post by Calif Bill
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.
Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)
Listen? :-)
I learned code back in the Navy. It wasn't used much anymore, but we still
had to learn it. To pass the course we had to do 20 wpm minimum with no
more than 1 or two mistakes IIRC. I passed with 35 wpm.
Right now I doubt I could do the alphabet in 10 minutes and would still need
a book.
It's funny - I learned as a kid and I don't think there was ever a
time that I couldn't keep up at 20 wpm. My mother was a USCG radio
operator during WWII and up until the day she kind of faded away, she
could copy solid at 30 wpm - it's was pretty amazing.
A lot of people don't know this, but learning the code, you've passed
the test. When you learn the code, it's actually at 5 wpm, a little
closer to 7 wpm actually.
Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.
In theory.
Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.
In Morse. :>)
The ground nav aids for aircraft sent their ID in morse, and the pilots were
expected to copy 5 wpm. We sent at, I think, 3 wpm. I just looked at the
tabs in the equipment to see if we sent the proper codes. This was for
TACAN, LORAN, ILS systems. This was 1965 and I expect they still use morse
to ID.
I don't know if this is still necessary, but it used to be that AM
radio stations used to use CW under their signals for ID purposes. It
was also a requirement for radio location for AM anyway.

I know when I was a kid, we used to use a small AM radio to radio
locate WESX in Salem, one in Beverly (which doesn't exist anymore) and
WBZ in Boston. You could get a pretty solid fix on your position
doing that. You would fix north, then compare the signal bearing from
WESX, Beverly and WBZ. Head for the station. :>)

Eventually, my Dad purchased one of those Zenith portable radios with
the swing antenna with a compass rose - you'd fix North, then sweep
for a bearing on the AM signal. That thing would put you in a box 100
yards by 100 yards.

Ah - those were the days. Navigating by the seat of your pants.

Nothing like it.

----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Calif Bill
2006-10-20 17:58:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 03:59:26 GMT, "Calif Bill"
Post by Calif Bill
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that
has
the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can
figure
it
out.
Wayne has a IC700 I think. Nice radio.
Hey, listen around enough you might even get the bug - who knows. :>)
Listen? :-)
I learned code back in the Navy. It wasn't used much anymore, but we still
had to learn it. To pass the course we had to do 20 wpm minimum with no
more than 1 or two mistakes IIRC. I passed with 35 wpm.
Right now I doubt I could do the alphabet in 10 minutes and would still need
a book.
It's funny - I learned as a kid and I don't think there was ever a
time that I couldn't keep up at 20 wpm. My mother was a USCG radio
operator during WWII and up until the day she kind of faded away, she
could copy solid at 30 wpm - it's was pretty amazing.
A lot of people don't know this, but learning the code, you've passed
the test. When you learn the code, it's actually at 5 wpm, a little
closer to 7 wpm actually.
Funny thing about code. When the USCG finally put code to bed and out
of service, they had this big ceremony out where the old Marconi
station was on the Cape - whole big last transmission - Auld Lang Syne
- never more to be used - I have a copy of the last transmission and
a certificate from the USCG about the last transmission (you had to
copy it and send in the transcript) - big deal - historical, blah,
blah, blah. Ten minutes later, USCG signed off with SK and that was
that.
In theory.
Half hour later, SOS from a freighter off the coast of Alaska and
rescue operations coordinated.
In Morse. :>)
The ground nav aids for aircraft sent their ID in morse, and the pilots were
expected to copy 5 wpm. We sent at, I think, 3 wpm. I just looked at the
tabs in the equipment to see if we sent the proper codes. This was for
TACAN, LORAN, ILS systems. This was 1965 and I expect they still use morse
to ID.
I don't know if this is still necessary, but it used to be that AM
radio stations used to use CW under their signals for ID purposes. It
was also a requirement for radio location for AM anyway.
I know when I was a kid, we used to use a small AM radio to radio
locate WESX in Salem, one in Beverly (which doesn't exist anymore) and
WBZ in Boston. You could get a pretty solid fix on your position
doing that. You would fix north, then compare the signal bearing from
WESX, Beverly and WBZ. Head for the station. :>)
Eventually, my Dad purchased one of those Zenith portable radios with
the swing antenna with a compass rose - you'd fix North, then sweep
for a bearing on the AM signal. That thing would put you in a box 100
yards by 100 yards.
Ah - those were the days. Navigating by the seat of your pants.
Nothing like it.
----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
We used a portable radio with the bar antenna on it, that we rotated the
radio to get the best signals from different San Francisco and Oakland radio
stations to find the Golden Gate Bridge entrance to SF Bay. We never failed
to return home, so was a valid system.
Larry
2006-10-20 19:53:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calif Bill
We used a portable radio with the bar antenna on it, that we rotated
the radio to get the best signals from different San Francisco and
Oakland radio stations to find the Golden Gate Bridge entrance to SF
Bay. We never failed to return home, so was a valid system.
Heathkit used to make an RDF little portable receiver with a loopstick
mounted in a rotating housing on top for RDF fixes. Worked great!
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 00:36:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Calif Bill
We used a portable radio with the bar antenna on it, that we rotated
the radio to get the best signals from different San Francisco and
Oakland radio stations to find the Golden Gate Bridge entrance to SF
Bay. We never failed to return home, so was a valid system.
Heathkit used to make an RDF little portable receiver with a loopstick
mounted in a rotating housing on top for RDF fixes. Worked great!
My very first phone DX contact was with a Heathkit 10 meter "lunchbox"
off an 11 meter CB whip on the back of my then boss's VW Bus which was
the TV delivery van. A DL1 as I recall. On a radio I built with my
own two hands. :>)

I was so excited about it that I forgot my call sign at the time.


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-21 01:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
My very first phone DX contact was with a Heathkit 10 meter "lunchbox"
off an 11 meter CB whip on the back of my then boss's VW Bus which was
the TV delivery van. A DL1 as I recall. On a radio I built with my
own two hands. :>)
I was so excited about it that I forgot my call sign at the time.
My introduction to ham radio came at the hands of some really old hams in
Moravia, NY. Jerry Hess, K2HWC, owned a surplus electronics shop on main
street, a junk warehouse of WW2 he used to buy/sell in a bombed out
storefront whos best feature was a coal-fired pot belly stove that kept
the place toasty warm all winter and a great place for us little nerds to
hang out. Debbie Hart, a nice old man who live a few streets away from
us, was a retired radio/TV repairman. By the time I was 9 years old, I
could find a net on Debbie's National NC-303 receiver, zero the
Hallicrafters HT-32 transmitter to the net frequency, tune the
transmitter to a fine pitch and be checked in using Debbie's call, which
at the moment I cannot remember from 1955, though I sent it for nearly 2
years almost nightly. Debbie took me under his wing, mistakenly, then,
like Mr Wilson and Dennis, couldn't get rid of me....or my other friends
totally enthralled with ham radio.

The old guys hung around Jerry's stove one Saturday morning, as they did
EVERY Saturday morning since before WW2, and finally decided if they ever
wanted to get to use their own stations, again, they'd better get us our
own ham licenses and build some Novice stations for us to take home.

For weeks, on Jerry's tired old wooden workbench I can still visualize
piled up with the residue of years of building and repairing junk, they
pulled stuff out of Jerry's attic warehouse, tore apart priceless WW2
equipments and we each ended up with a homebrew novice transmitter (5Y3
rectifier and a 6V6 xtal oscillator/power amp with plugin coils lovingly
hand wound for 80, 40 and 15 meters. An assortment of huge old Navy and
Army crystals materialized that us boys used to swap amoungst ourselves
so we could move across the bands to new territories without encroaching
onto the old ham's off-limits DX. 15 watts, TV twinlead balanced feeders
to 3 folded dipoles, also made of TV twinlead Jerry must have had 10
miles of on various spools and we were on the air! Several old, not-so-
stable receivers, like my Hallicrafters Sky Buddy, came to us after some
feelers put out on the central NY 75 meter AM phone net. Many old hams
responded with receivers, parts, coils-to-drool-over for exotic antenna
tuners....mostly built on scraps of 2X4s our mothers were terrified of
because they had seen some of our more famous flashovers and arcs or
exploding 6V6s. (If the plate falls into the grounded beam forming plates
it takes out the 5Y3, too. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt.)

I wore the dial cord out on the Sky Buddy more than once scanning for DX.
I also was moved from my bedroom to my fathers garage in a little heated
room he made for my hamshack so they could get some sleep at night away
from my whooping and ranting from working some Russian or Japan or other
exotic place. I remember causing quite a stir in 5th grade by bringing
in my first QSL card from a Russian, via the Moscow Radio Club at KGB
headquarters, of course. That was on 15M Novice CW about 1957. I was
already famous for bringing in cards and letters from WOM, WCC, NSS, etc.
confirming my copying (sometimes better than they could) some ship comms
to the shore stations on the old marine bands. That's where I learned
how to copy CW to get my license. (I didn't know until I heard the code
machine that Morse was supposed to be sent WITHOUT the chirping from the
ship's nasty CW transmitter jumping frequency.)

Of course, this sealed my fate in school as a smartass and none of the
girls would have anything to do with me....unless their record player
wasn't working, of course. (This hasn't changed since I was 12. They
still call me only to fix something.) Such is our fate....It's all ham
radio's fault, you know...(c;
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 01:42:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
I wore the dial cord out on the Sky Buddy more than once scanning for DX.
I also was moved from my bedroom to my fathers garage in a little heated
room he made for my hamshack so they could get some sleep at night away
from my whooping and ranting from working some Russian or Japan or other
exotic place. I remember causing quite a stir in 5th grade by bringing
in my first QSL card from a Russian, via the Moscow Radio Club at KGB
headquarters, of course. That was on 15M Novice CW about 1957. I was
already famous for bringing in cards and letters from WOM, WCC, NSS, etc.
confirming my copying (sometimes better than they could) some ship comms
to the shore stations on the old marine bands. That's where I learned
how to copy CW to get my license. (I didn't know until I heard the code
machine that Morse was supposed to be sent WITHOUT the chirping from the
ship's nasty CW transmitter jumping frequency.)
Oh good lord man those were the days. Every time you tinkered with
something, it was new and interesting and even though nobody else
cared, it was totally cool.
Post by Larry
Of course, this sealed my fate in school as a smartass and none of the
girls would have anything to do with me....unless their record player
wasn't working, of course. (This hasn't changed since I was 12. They
still call me only to fix something.) Such is our fate....It's all ham
radio's fault, you know...(c;
Of course. :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Wayne.B
2006-10-20 02:28:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
I'd recommend replacing it with an Icom 802. The 802 makes a much
better ham rig and it goes back to marine only with the push of a
button.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:25:58 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 22:28:14 -0400, Wayne.B
Post by Wayne.B
Post by Eisboch
Mrs.E.'s GB has an Icom IC700 or 710 (can't remember which one) that has the
marine freqs plus all the HF ham freqs. Next summer I'll set up the antenna
again (taken down during the boat refurbishment) and see if I can figure it
out.
I'd recommend replacing it with an Icom 802. The 802 makes a much
better ham rig and it goes back to marine only with the push of a
button.
I'm not an Icom guy and aren't all that familiar with their radios
other than what I hear.

I know they make a version of that radio for marine use - maybe the
502?
Wayne.B
2006-10-20 13:10:15 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:25:58 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'm not an Icom guy and aren't all that familiar with their radios
other than what I hear.
I know they make a version of that radio for marine use - maybe the
502?
The 802 *is* a marine radio but it is also easy to use it on the ham
bands, closely approximating VFO mode when used that way.
Wayne.B
2006-10-20 02:25:54 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 00:38:41 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
And I need to concentrate on what the new boat is going to be. I'd
prefer to operate from a cabin rather than an open center console. :>)
Something like a Grand Banks 49 trawler perhaps ?

You could run 3 rigs at the same time with air conditioning and the
20kw genset wouldn't even be breathing hard. :-)
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:23:25 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 22:25:54 -0400, Wayne.B
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 00:38:41 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
And I need to concentrate on what the new boat is going to be. I'd
prefer to operate from a cabin rather than an open center console. :>)
Something like a Grand Banks 49 trawler perhaps ?
You could run 3 rigs at the same time with air conditioning and the
20kw genset wouldn't even be breathing hard. :-)
I don't even want to think about a GB...

THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!

Although I know somebody who would embrace the concept with great
huzzahs.
Wayne.B
2006-10-20 13:11:28 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:23:25 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!
Maybe you could get the turbo option and install a fighting chair with
some outriggers and tuna tower.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 15:11:41 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 09:11:28 -0400, Wayne.B
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:23:25 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!
Maybe you could get the turbo option and install a fighting chair with
some outriggers and tuna tower.
Or perhaps retroit to 1,200 hp supercharged MANs.

Along with the fighting chair, outriggers and tuna tower. :>)


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Larry
2006-10-20 19:51:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
1,200 hp supercharged MANs
Aren't they those MANs with the connecting rods sticking out through the
block?....(c;
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Eisboch
2006-10-20 17:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:23:25 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!
Maybe you could get the turbo option and install a fighting chair with
some outriggers and tuna tower.
The guy two boats over from me has the GB 52' Europa. Twin Cat 3208s - non
turbo.
It's a 10 kt boat.

Eisboch
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 18:26:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eisboch
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:23:25 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!
Maybe you could get the turbo option and install a fighting chair with
some outriggers and tuna tower.
The guy two boats over from me has the GB 52' Europa. Twin Cat 3208s - non
turbo.
It's a 10 kt boat.
How do you guys stand it?

My boat doesn't even plane at 10 knots.

Whoof...


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Wayne.B
2006-10-20 18:59:15 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 18:26:47 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
How do you guys stand it?
My boat doesn't even plane at 10 knots.
Slow and steady wins the race, and a good autopilot relieves the
tedium factor. I enjoy running on a fast plane for an hour or two but
after that I'm ready to relax a bit. Out in the ocean on a nice day,
no traffic and running on autopilot, it really doesn't get much
better: Plenty of time to navigate, check the weather, take in the
sights, grab a snack, etc., and no issues with taking a wave wrong or
smacking a log at 25 to 30 kts.

I can't tell you how many times I've had faster boats flying by me,
only to see them tied up at the next fuel dock as we go by.

We get to pick when and where we refuel. Only one stop required
between SWFL and CT, carefuly selected for best price.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-21 00:37:31 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 14:59:15 -0400, Wayne.B
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 18:26:47 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
How do you guys stand it?
My boat doesn't even plane at 10 knots.
Slow and steady wins the race, and a good autopilot relieves the
tedium factor. I enjoy running on a fast plane for an hour or two but
after that I'm ready to relax a bit. Out in the ocean on a nice day,
no traffic and running on autopilot, it really doesn't get much
better: Plenty of time to navigate, check the weather, take in the
sights, grab a snack, etc., and no issues with taking a wave wrong or
smacking a log at 25 to 30 kts.
I can't tell you how many times I've had faster boats flying by me,
only to see them tied up at the next fuel dock as we go by.
We get to pick when and where we refuel. Only one stop required
between SWFL and CT, carefuly selected for best price.
I suppose.

Just not my cup of tea.

Although somebody close to me would much prefer it to zipping along.


----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
Calif Bill
2006-10-21 00:52:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 14:59:15 -0400, Wayne.B
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 18:26:47 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
How do you guys stand it?
My boat doesn't even plane at 10 knots.
Slow and steady wins the race, and a good autopilot relieves the
tedium factor. I enjoy running on a fast plane for an hour or two but
after that I'm ready to relax a bit. Out in the ocean on a nice day,
no traffic and running on autopilot, it really doesn't get much
better: Plenty of time to navigate, check the weather, take in the
sights, grab a snack, etc., and no issues with taking a wave wrong or
smacking a log at 25 to 30 kts.
I can't tell you how many times I've had faster boats flying by me,
only to see them tied up at the next fuel dock as we go by.
We get to pick when and where we refuel. Only one stop required
between SWFL and CT, carefuly selected for best price.
I suppose.
Just not my cup of tea.
Although somebody close to me would much prefer it to zipping along.
----------------
Disclaimer: This is a boating post and applies to boaters. It is not
intended to provoke, annoy, irritate, bother, aggravate, anger,incite,
inflame, infuriate or create controversy resulting in unacceptable
behavior on the part of other posters nor is it intended to generate
political commentary or off-topic debate.
About a boat like this. Local guy in the fishing group has one.
Viking 68c
Series 2000-V16 M91 2030 MHP

Will go faster than 10 knots.
Eisboch
2006-10-20 20:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Eisboch
Post by Wayne.B
On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 10:23:25 GMT, Short Wave Sportfishing
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
THE HORROR, THE HUMANITY!!!
Maybe you could get the turbo option and install a fighting chair with
some outriggers and tuna tower.
The guy two boats over from me has the GB 52' Europa. Twin Cat 3208s - non
turbo.
It's a 10 kt boat.
How do you guys stand it?
My boat doesn't even plane at 10 knots.
It's hard to explain. Different type of boating. The easy
chuga-chuga-chuga is actually very relaxing.
Things don't happen fast so you can just enjoy the view and ride.

Eisboch
Larry
2006-10-20 03:47:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Outbacker HF mobile antenna.
Is that still a fishing rod wound with hookup wire tapped with banana jacks
and shrink wrapped, like it always was?

Sure hope it works better than it used to. Something that expensive
shouldn't just suck so bad....
--
There's amazing intelligence in the Universe.
You can tell because none of them ever called Earth.
Short Wave Sportfishing
2006-10-20 10:21:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
Outbacker HF mobile antenna.
Is that still a fishing rod wound with hookup wire tapped with banana jacks
and shrink wrapped, like it always was?
Sure hope it works better than it used to. Something that expensive
shouldn't just suck so bad....
Nope- it's a decent rig. It's not something that I would consider
"strong" mobile antenna, but as an emergency or portable antenna, it's
not a bad rig.

Be perfect for the boat though.
wf3h
2006-10-21 01:40:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Short Wave Sportfishing
I'll be on 7.030 MHz (cw) for the next half hour testing the new
Outbacker HF mobile antenna. I'm in high speed mode once again - only
took about a hour practice to get the copy speed up to 40 WPM.
I plan on using this on my boat this coming summer so I can have HF
capability for contesting - rare grid squares don't 'cha know.
took HF on friend's boat a few years ago...all of us hams...was great
to have aboard and you're gonna have lotsa fun...good luck
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