Discussion:
Observations, Sea Ray 200 Select
(too old to reply)
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-17 23:49:28 UTC
Permalink
At the Ramp, July 6 2005

Sea Ray 200 Select
(Go fast, look good, have fun!)


Some of the most successful boats are vessels with a clear purpose. A
commercial tug has a specific task to perform, just as surely as a
fireboat, a purse seiner, an America's Cup racer, or a ferry boat.
Some recreational vessels have easily identified missions, with most
people thinking of a trawler for long range cruising, a sportfisherman
for offshore angling, a cabin cruiser for vacation gunkholing, etc. One
class of boat, the runabout, is strictly intended to go fast, look
good, and create opportunities for fun on the water. Sea Ray is one of
the premiere, benchmark, brand names in the runabout category. (Easily
verified by strolling through a boat show and overhearing competing
salespeople assure prospects that "Brand X is just as good as a Sea
Ray!")

Seas Ray offers four series in its Sport Boat division. The "Sport"
series boats are nominally 18-20 feet in length, offering a basic, high
quality, but relatively affordable choice. The "Select" boats are
nominally 20-29 feet long, and include several upgrades in standard
equipment that would be optional or not available on the "Sport"
series. The "Sundeck" series, (20-27 feet) are well-equipped boats
with enclosed heads, while the "Weekender" series (22-25 feet)
offers a V-berth as well as a head.

The 200 Select is actually 21' LOA, with an 8'5" beam. Draft with
the drive unit down is 37", but that drops to just 20" with the
drive unit up to facilitate easier loading and unloading at a boat
ramp. Sea Ray lists the "dry weight" of the 200 Select at 3,550
pounds, so it won't require a Kenworth to haul it around. Fuel
capacity is 37-gallons, which should be sufficient for a long, active,
afternoon of waterski or wakeboard runs or up to an entire weekend of
slowpoke exploring and fishing.

We got an up-close look at a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select at Lake Union
Sea Ray's Seattle showroom on Westlake Avenue. Sales Manager Bob
Walker hosted us during our visit there. (Thanks, Bob).

The 200 Select hull features a 20-degree deadrise to provide some of
the seakeeping characteristics of a "deep-V" bottom. There is a
sequence of flat strakes between the keel and the chines. The strakes
provide some additional lifting surface to get the 200 Select more
quickly up on plane, and also provide some specific support points that
increase lateral stability and decrease the likelihood of chine walk.
Seating is available in the open bow section, in pilot and port watch
seats, and on a seat immediately forward of the engine compartment. The
200 Select is rated for up to 8 persons weighing a total of no more
than 1100 pounds, or a 1200-pound maximum load with gear.

Sea Ray boats are built by one of the most highly automated processes
in the industry. Gelcoats are applied to molds by specialized robots,
the hull structure created by a computer controlled application process
known as RIMFIRE (Robotic In-Mold Fiber Reinforcement) and molded
fiberglass components produced by Sea Ray's ZIP (Zero Injection
Pressure) process. Workmanship can be the most radical variable in
manufacturing, and the computerized robotics assure that workmanship is
extremely consistent from one boat to the next. With the addition of
premium materials and a thoroughly proven design, a high quality
product is easily achieved.

If runabouts are all about "go fast, look good, have fun" the Sea
Ray 200 Select is well designed and equipped for the task. The boat at
Lake Union Sea Ray was equipped with the optional 5.0 liter (305 cid)
multi-port injected Mercruiser and an Alpha I outdrive. Sea Ray reports
that with this propulsion combination, a clean bottom, and a stainless
steel prop, the 200 Select will reach 50 mph at WOT, 4950 RPM. Nobody
wants to run an engine that hard for more than brief periods, but
speeds should still be in the 35 mph range with the boat backed down to
2/3 throttle. Wakeboarding, recreational water skiing, or just zipping
across the lake or down the sound fast enough to be exciting is all
within easy reach for owners of a Sea Ray 200 Select. Go fast? Check.

Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but one would need to be
legally blind not to appreciate that the Sea Ray 200 Select meets some
extremely high standards in the "looking good" category. The lines
are snappy, imparting a confident and slightly aggressive demeanor to
the profile. The high-quality stainless hardware, almost totally
perfect and mirror-smooth robot applied gelcoat, and high quality
interior surfaces are blended together with bold hull graphics and
upholstery inserts that make the 200 Select look like a fast boat when
it's standing still. Pearl is the standard hull color for the Select
series, accented with silver graphics. The boat we inspected at Lake
Union Sea Ray was finished with in a sporty red and white two-tone,
with red gelcoat between the waterline and the stylishly curved rub
rail. (Very nice). Additional gel coat color options include green,
blue, yellow, black, and a bronze called "pewter". A 200 Select
will draw appreciative glances from nearly all, and envious admiration
from a group of boaters who will be making a series of mental
comparisons between the 200 Select and the boats they currently own.
Look good? Absolutely

Like any boat, the Sea Ray 200 Select won't score well in the "have
fun" category until there are some people aboard. The skipper and his
or her passengers will have a blast aboard a 200 Select, as Sea Ray has
incorporated a number of premium features in an ergonomically excellent
environment. The seating forward of the windshield is accessed through
a hinged section of the stainless steel frame and a central
companionway below.
When the forward seats are not in use, a folding door can be secured
across the companionway to prevent wind from blowing under the
windshield and onto the helm seats. Sea Ray built an anchor locker into
the bow of the 200 Select, included large storage areas below the
forward seats, added grab rails just exactly where they will be most
helpful, provided courtesy lighting for sure footing after dark, and
used some nicely upholstered, comfortable cushions. There are no
"cheap seats" on a Sea Ray 200 Select.

Aft of the windshield in the cockpit, the helm is to starboard. A
deluxe helm seat with a flip up bolster will allow the skipper to sit a
bit higher, or even stand at the helm with some support. SmartCraft
(tm) instruments and indicators include fuel level, oil pressure,
coolant temperature, voltmeter, speedometer, tachometer, overheat or
low oil pressure alarms, depth sounder, fuel consumption meter, trim
level, and a trolling control. The wood grain tilt wheel is power
assisted, with a tilt function. Sea Ray has demonstrated an
appreciation for the importance of a comfortable, well organized helm.

At the port watch seat, there is a locker designed to hold a bag of ice
as well as several cans or bottles or refreshing beverages. Cupholders
on the 200 Select are stainless steel.
Listening to music can be an important element when having fun on the
water, and the 200 Select is equipped with an AM/FM/CD stereo system,
protected from the elements in a compartment above the ice locker. The
stereo system is Sirius (tm) satellite capable, and includes a remote
control at the helm.

Additional cockpit seating includes a curved settee just forward of the
engine compartment, and the engine compartment is covered with a thick,
comfortable cushion for ideal for sunbathing. In the standard layout,
(on display at Lake Union Sea Ray), a single seat with a removable
cushion is situated in the aft port quarter of the cockpit. Passengers
stepping aboard the 200 Select can remove the cushion and step on a
non-skid deck surface below, thereby eliminating the need to step
directly on upholstered surfaces when boarding or disembarking.

Fun? You betcha!

Sea Ray offers many additional, useful options for the Sea Ray 200
Select. Boaters particularly passionate about wakeboarding might want
to ad a jaunty-looking stainless wakeboard tower. Family boaters hoping
to extend the season beyond the warm, sunny months might consider the
"camper canvas" option to convert the open cockpit into an enclosed
compartment.

The Sea Ray 200 Select will paint smiles across the faces of any
boaters primarily interested in looking good, going fast, and having
fun. Boats like this are the "sports cars" of the water. Even
though Sea Ray is one of the elite trademarks, it's possible to own a
very, very nice boat for no more than what an increasing number of
families are spending for to acquire a new car. According to Bob Walker
at Lake Union Sea Ray, a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select, with trailer,
will sell "in the mid-30's".

Go fast, look good, have fun? Runabout enthusiasts should consider
making a fast trip to the nearest Sea Ray dealer, taking a good look at
the 200 Select, and preparing to have one heck of a lot of fun.
John H
2005-06-18 00:10:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
At the Ramp, July 6 2005
Sea Ray 200 Select
(Go fast, look good, have fun!)
Some of the most successful boats are vessels with a clear purpose. A
commercial tug has a specific task to perform, just as surely as a
fireboat, a purse seiner, an America's Cup racer, or a ferry boat.
Some recreational vessels have easily identified missions, with most
people thinking of a trawler for long range cruising, a sportfisherman
for offshore angling, a cabin cruiser for vacation gunkholing, etc. One
class of boat, the runabout, is strictly intended to go fast, look
good, and create opportunities for fun on the water. Sea Ray is one of
the premiere, benchmark, brand names in the runabout category. (Easily
verified by strolling through a boat show and overhearing competing
salespeople assure prospects that "Brand X is just as good as a Sea
Ray!")
Seas Ray offers four series in its Sport Boat division. The "Sport"
series boats are nominally 18-20 feet in length, offering a basic, high
quality, but relatively affordable choice. The "Select" boats are
nominally 20-29 feet long, and include several upgrades in standard
equipment that would be optional or not available on the "Sport"
series. The "Sundeck" series, (20-27 feet) are well-equipped boats
with enclosed heads, while the "Weekender" series (22-25 feet)
offers a V-berth as well as a head.
The 200 Select is actually 21' LOA, with an 8'5" beam. Draft with
the drive unit down is 37", but that drops to just 20" with the
drive unit up to facilitate easier loading and unloading at a boat
ramp. Sea Ray lists the "dry weight" of the 200 Select at 3,550
pounds, so it won't require a Kenworth to haul it around. Fuel
capacity is 37-gallons, which should be sufficient for a long, active,
afternoon of waterski or wakeboard runs or up to an entire weekend of
slowpoke exploring and fishing.
We got an up-close look at a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select at Lake Union
Sea Ray's Seattle showroom on Westlake Avenue. Sales Manager Bob
Walker hosted us during our visit there. (Thanks, Bob).
The 200 Select hull features a 20-degree deadrise to provide some of
the seakeeping characteristics of a "deep-V" bottom. There is a
sequence of flat strakes between the keel and the chines. The strakes
provide some additional lifting surface to get the 200 Select more
quickly up on plane, and also provide some specific support points that
increase lateral stability and decrease the likelihood of chine walk.
Seating is available in the open bow section, in pilot and port watch
seats, and on a seat immediately forward of the engine compartment. The
200 Select is rated for up to 8 persons weighing a total of no more
than 1100 pounds, or a 1200-pound maximum load with gear.
Sea Ray boats are built by one of the most highly automated processes
in the industry. Gelcoats are applied to molds by specialized robots,
the hull structure created by a computer controlled application process
known as RIMFIRE (Robotic In-Mold Fiber Reinforcement) and molded
fiberglass components produced by Sea Ray's ZIP (Zero Injection
Pressure) process. Workmanship can be the most radical variable in
manufacturing, and the computerized robotics assure that workmanship is
extremely consistent from one boat to the next. With the addition of
premium materials and a thoroughly proven design, a high quality
product is easily achieved.
If runabouts are all about "go fast, look good, have fun" the Sea
Ray 200 Select is well designed and equipped for the task. The boat at
Lake Union Sea Ray was equipped with the optional 5.0 liter (305 cid)
multi-port injected Mercruiser and an Alpha I outdrive. Sea Ray reports
that with this propulsion combination, a clean bottom, and a stainless
steel prop, the 200 Select will reach 50 mph at WOT, 4950 RPM. Nobody
wants to run an engine that hard for more than brief periods, but
speeds should still be in the 35 mph range with the boat backed down to
2/3 throttle. Wakeboarding, recreational water skiing, or just zipping
across the lake or down the sound fast enough to be exciting is all
within easy reach for owners of a Sea Ray 200 Select. Go fast? Check.
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but one would need to be
legally blind not to appreciate that the Sea Ray 200 Select meets some
extremely high standards in the "looking good" category. The lines
are snappy, imparting a confident and slightly aggressive demeanor to
the profile. The high-quality stainless hardware, almost totally
perfect and mirror-smooth robot applied gelcoat, and high quality
interior surfaces are blended together with bold hull graphics and
upholstery inserts that make the 200 Select look like a fast boat when
it's standing still. Pearl is the standard hull color for the Select
series, accented with silver graphics. The boat we inspected at Lake
Union Sea Ray was finished with in a sporty red and white two-tone,
with red gelcoat between the waterline and the stylishly curved rub
rail. (Very nice). Additional gel coat color options include green,
blue, yellow, black, and a bronze called "pewter". A 200 Select
will draw appreciative glances from nearly all, and envious admiration
from a group of boaters who will be making a series of mental
comparisons between the 200 Select and the boats they currently own.
Look good? Absolutely
Like any boat, the Sea Ray 200 Select won't score well in the "have
fun" category until there are some people aboard. The skipper and his
or her passengers will have a blast aboard a 200 Select, as Sea Ray has
incorporated a number of premium features in an ergonomically excellent
environment. The seating forward of the windshield is accessed through
a hinged section of the stainless steel frame and a central
companionway below.
When the forward seats are not in use, a folding door can be secured
across the companionway to prevent wind from blowing under the
windshield and onto the helm seats. Sea Ray built an anchor locker into
the bow of the 200 Select, included large storage areas below the
forward seats, added grab rails just exactly where they will be most
helpful, provided courtesy lighting for sure footing after dark, and
used some nicely upholstered, comfortable cushions. There are no
"cheap seats" on a Sea Ray 200 Select.
Aft of the windshield in the cockpit, the helm is to starboard. A
deluxe helm seat with a flip up bolster will allow the skipper to sit a
bit higher, or even stand at the helm with some support. SmartCraft
(tm) instruments and indicators include fuel level, oil pressure,
coolant temperature, voltmeter, speedometer, tachometer, overheat or
low oil pressure alarms, depth sounder, fuel consumption meter, trim
level, and a trolling control. The wood grain tilt wheel is power
assisted, with a tilt function. Sea Ray has demonstrated an
appreciation for the importance of a comfortable, well organized helm.
At the port watch seat, there is a locker designed to hold a bag of ice
as well as several cans or bottles or refreshing beverages. Cupholders
on the 200 Select are stainless steel.
Listening to music can be an important element when having fun on the
water, and the 200 Select is equipped with an AM/FM/CD stereo system,
protected from the elements in a compartment above the ice locker. The
stereo system is Sirius (tm) satellite capable, and includes a remote
control at the helm.
Additional cockpit seating includes a curved settee just forward of the
engine compartment, and the engine compartment is covered with a thick,
comfortable cushion for ideal for sunbathing. In the standard layout,
(on display at Lake Union Sea Ray), a single seat with a removable
cushion is situated in the aft port quarter of the cockpit. Passengers
stepping aboard the 200 Select can remove the cushion and step on a
non-skid deck surface below, thereby eliminating the need to step
directly on upholstered surfaces when boarding or disembarking.
Fun? You betcha!
Sea Ray offers many additional, useful options for the Sea Ray 200
Select. Boaters particularly passionate about wakeboarding might want
to ad a jaunty-looking stainless wakeboard tower. Family boaters hoping
to extend the season beyond the warm, sunny months might consider the
"camper canvas" option to convert the open cockpit into an enclosed
compartment.
The Sea Ray 200 Select will paint smiles across the faces of any
boaters primarily interested in looking good, going fast, and having
fun. Boats like this are the "sports cars" of the water. Even
though Sea Ray is one of the elite trademarks, it's possible to own a
very, very nice boat for no more than what an increasing number of
families are spending for to acquire a new car. According to Bob Walker
at Lake Union Sea Ray, a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select, with trailer,
will sell "in the mid-30's".
Go fast, look good, have fun? Runabout enthusiasts should consider
making a fast trip to the nearest Sea Ray dealer, taking a good look at
the 200 Select, and preparing to have one heck of a lot of fun.
Nice write up, but no rod holders!

http://www.boattest.com/oem/photo-gallery.aspx?ID=565&lp_id=32&from_gi=yes
--
John H

"All decisions are the result of binary thinking."
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 00:25:01 UTC
Permalink
Nice write up, but no rod holders!


*************************


It's about going fast, looking good, and having fun.

So- find yourself a "fast" lady, who looks good, and get her to hold
your rod. You'll surely have a lot of fun.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 00:40:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by John H
Nice write up, but no rod holders!
*************************
It's about going fast, looking good, and having fun.
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.

Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.

How funny.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 01:01:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
Post by John H
Nice write up, but no rod holders!
*************************
It's about going fast, looking good, and having fun.
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.
Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.
How funny.
Have you, at last, no shame? You and your compadres add nothing of
value, ever, to this newsgroup, to discussions of boats, fishing,
boating topics, politics, anything. None of you can write anything
original worth the read, and all you do is gripe about those who try.

Go get laid. Or something. Maybe Karen Smith will do you. Or maybe
Smithers in one of his female IDs here will.

You're really pathetic.

You don't have a boat, your boy Smithers doesn't have a boat, and I
doubt any of the other members of your pointy-headed klan have a boat,
either, with the exception of Herring.

Find yourself a newsgroup of losers, and take your bullyboys with you.
All of them.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
John H
2005-06-18 11:22:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by HarryKrause
Post by *JimH*
Post by John H
Nice write up, but no rod holders!
*************************
It's about going fast, looking good, and having fun.
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.
Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.
How funny.
Have you, at last, no shame? You and your compadres add nothing of
value, ever, to this newsgroup, to discussions of boats, fishing,
boating topics, politics, anything. None of you can write anything
original worth the read, and all you do is gripe about those who try.
Go get laid. Or something. Maybe Karen Smith will do you. Or maybe
Smithers in one of his female IDs here will.
You're really pathetic.
You don't have a boat, your boy Smithers doesn't have a boat, and I
doubt any of the other members of your pointy-headed klan have a boat,
either, with the exception of Herring.
Find yourself a newsgroup of losers, and take your bullyboys with you.
All of them.
Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH! Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.
--
John H

"All decisions are the result of binary thinking."
Don White
2005-06-18 20:21:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by John H
Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH! Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.
JohnH....are you on crack cocaine...or just making a joke?
Everyone here with a lick of common sense sees through JimH's preaching.
Put him on TV...he could probably squeeze enough money out of the
guilable old ladies to buy a boat...or a yellow Mustang.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 21:45:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don White
Post by John H
Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH! Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.
JohnH....are you on crack cocaine...or just making a joke?
Everyone here with a lick of common sense sees through JimH's preaching.
Put him on TV...he could probably squeeze enough money out of the
guilable old ladies to buy a boat...or a yellow Mustang.
Is he gay, too? Yellow 'stangs are the hot color for gays.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 20:46:07 UTC
Permalink
John H wrote:

Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH!
Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many
years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.

********

John, are you saying that JimH can outKrause Krause?
Wow, I guess that would be an accomplishment.
John H
2005-06-18 22:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by John H
Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH! Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.
********
John, are you saying that JimH can outKrause Krause?
Wow, I guess that would be an accomplishment.
I s'pose you're right. In some areas, Krause has yet to be outKraused!
--
John H

"All decisions are the result of binary thinking."
*JimH*
2005-06-28 16:30:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by John H
Harry, Harry, Harry! You're losing your serenity over comments by JimH! Don't
let them get to you. Remember, he's simply doing what you started many years
ago. Except, he does it better and no one doubts his word.
********
John, are you saying that JimH can outKrause Krause?
Wow, I guess that would be an accomplishment.
What was the lay-up schedule on this SeaRay 200 Select that you gave raving
reviews to Chuck? Surely you must know about the construction and
construction quality if your rave review is a valid one.

c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 01:17:19 UTC
Permalink
JimH wrote:

Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.

Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All
owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at

me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.


How funny.

***************

So here's your chance to demonstrate your vast boating knowledge. Do
you have anything factual to offer to counter my description and
expressed opinions, or is your main objection
to this boat- LIKE THE REST OF YOUR LIFE- centered on the negative
personal impressions you have formed of people who own one?

No matter how derisively you care to paint the stereotype of Sea Ray
owners, you'll never really come to grips with the fact that every one
of them owns a boat- and you don't.

Surprise us just once JimH. Just once, talk boats and not
personalities, if you can.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 01:28:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.
Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.
How funny.
***************
So here's your chance to demonstrate your vast boating knowledge. Do
you have anything factual to offer to counter my description and
expressed opinions, or is your main objection
to this boat- LIKE THE REST OF YOUR LIFE- centered on the negative
personal impressions you have formed of people who own one?
No matter how derisively you care to paint the stereotype of Sea Ray
owners, you'll never really come to grips with the fact that every one
of them owns a boat- and you don't.
Surprise us just once JimH. Just once, talk boats and not
personalities, if you can.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 01:33:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.
Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.
How funny.
***************
So here's your chance to demonstrate your vast boating knowledge. Do
you have anything factual to offer to counter my description and
expressed opinions, or is your main objection
to this boat-
As I said I have no knowledge of the boat but do find it strange that you
had no negative comments about it. All boats have good and bad
points....you choose, however, to misdirect the buying public by publishing
only positive fluff.

I know for a fact that SeaRay took a downturn in 1990 when the Brunswick
purchase took grasp of their design and construction quality. Do you argue
that?
Post by *JimH*
LIKE THE REST OF YOUR LIFE- centered on the negative
personal impressions you have formed of people who own one?
Another personal attack...a sure sign you are losing this discussion.
Post by *JimH*
No matter how derisively you care to paint the stereotype of Sea Ray
owners, you'll never really come to grips with the fact that every one
of them owns a boat- and you don't.
Come on Chuck. You are really reaching bottom.
Post by *JimH*
Surprise us just once JimH. Just once, talk boats and not
personalities, if you can.
In recent months I have more on topic post than you do Chuck. You also have
more off topic posts than I do. Want to bet those facts Chuck?
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 01:47:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
I know for a fact that SeaRay took a downturn in 1990 when the Brunswick
purchase took grasp of their design and construction quality. Do you argue
that?
Your knowledge of SeaRays stopped 15 years ago, and you assume the boats
are no better today than you think they were in 1990? Based on what?
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 02:38:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
Post by *JimH*
Wow, a member of the "I own a SeaRay...look at me" club.
Gold chain holders......gold trim....fast boats...poor quality. All owned
by fat old farts with gold chains and with severe shrinkage...."look at
me"....I own a go fast SeaRay.
How funny.
***************
So here's your chance to demonstrate your vast boating knowledge. Do
you have anything factual to offer to counter my description and
expressed opinions, or is your main objection
to this boat-
As I said I have no knowledge of the boat but do find it strange that you
had no negative comments about it. All boats have good and bad
points....you choose, however, to misdirect the buying public by
publishing only positive fluff.
I know for a fact that SeaRay took a downturn in 1990 when the Brunswick
purchase took grasp of their design and construction quality. Do you
argue that?
Post by *JimH*
LIKE THE REST OF YOUR LIFE- centered on the negative
personal impressions you have formed of people who own one?
Another personal attack...a sure sign you are losing this discussion.
Post by *JimH*
No matter how derisively you care to paint the stereotype of Sea Ray
owners, you'll never really come to grips with the fact that every one
of them owns a boat- and you don't.
Come on Chuck. You are really reaching bottom.
Post by *JimH*
Surprise us just once JimH. Just once, talk boats and not
personalities, if you can.
In recent months I have more on topic post than you do Chuck. You also
have more off topic posts than I do. Want to bet those facts Chuck?
Silence.

How telling.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 04:36:00 UTC
Permalink
Silence.

How telling.


**********

Yeah, I went down to the boat for a couple of hours, enjoyed a nice
dinner and a Guinness.

Tough for you to imagine, being boatless and all.
John H
2005-06-18 11:14:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by John H
Nice write up, but no rod holders!
*************************
It's about going fast, looking good, and having fun.
So- find yourself a "fast" lady, who looks good, and get her to hold
your rod. You'll surely have a lot of fun.
Don't want no fast lady holdin' my rod in one hand and a bait-cuttin' Rapala in
the other!
--
John H

"All decisions are the result of binary thinking."
*JimH*
2005-06-18 00:34:00 UTC
Permalink
What were the downsides of the boat Chuck? Surely there had to be some.
Why did you not include them in your fluff article about the boat?

How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
Post by c***@gmail.com
At the Ramp, July 6 2005
Sea Ray 200 Select
(Go fast, look good, have fun!)
Some of the most successful boats are vessels with a clear purpose. A
commercial tug has a specific task to perform, just as surely as a
fireboat, a purse seiner, an America's Cup racer, or a ferry boat.
Some recreational vessels have easily identified missions, with most
people thinking of a trawler for long range cruising, a sportfisherman
for offshore angling, a cabin cruiser for vacation gunkholing, etc. One
class of boat, the runabout, is strictly intended to go fast, look
good, and create opportunities for fun on the water. Sea Ray is one of
the premiere, benchmark, brand names in the runabout category. (Easily
verified by strolling through a boat show and overhearing competing
salespeople assure prospects that "Brand X is just as good as a Sea
Ray!")
Seas Ray offers four series in its Sport Boat division. The "Sport"
series boats are nominally 18-20 feet in length, offering a basic, high
quality, but relatively affordable choice. The "Select" boats are
nominally 20-29 feet long, and include several upgrades in standard
equipment that would be optional or not available on the "Sport"
series. The "Sundeck" series, (20-27 feet) are well-equipped boats
with enclosed heads, while the "Weekender" series (22-25 feet)
offers a V-berth as well as a head.
The 200 Select is actually 21' LOA, with an 8'5" beam. Draft with
the drive unit down is 37", but that drops to just 20" with the
drive unit up to facilitate easier loading and unloading at a boat
ramp. Sea Ray lists the "dry weight" of the 200 Select at 3,550
pounds, so it won't require a Kenworth to haul it around. Fuel
capacity is 37-gallons, which should be sufficient for a long, active,
afternoon of waterski or wakeboard runs or up to an entire weekend of
slowpoke exploring and fishing.
We got an up-close look at a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select at Lake Union
Sea Ray's Seattle showroom on Westlake Avenue. Sales Manager Bob
Walker hosted us during our visit there. (Thanks, Bob).
The 200 Select hull features a 20-degree deadrise to provide some of
the seakeeping characteristics of a "deep-V" bottom. There is a
sequence of flat strakes between the keel and the chines. The strakes
provide some additional lifting surface to get the 200 Select more
quickly up on plane, and also provide some specific support points that
increase lateral stability and decrease the likelihood of chine walk.
Seating is available in the open bow section, in pilot and port watch
seats, and on a seat immediately forward of the engine compartment. The
200 Select is rated for up to 8 persons weighing a total of no more
than 1100 pounds, or a 1200-pound maximum load with gear.
Sea Ray boats are built by one of the most highly automated processes
in the industry. Gelcoats are applied to molds by specialized robots,
the hull structure created by a computer controlled application process
known as RIMFIRE (Robotic In-Mold Fiber Reinforcement) and molded
fiberglass components produced by Sea Ray's ZIP (Zero Injection
Pressure) process. Workmanship can be the most radical variable in
manufacturing, and the computerized robotics assure that workmanship is
extremely consistent from one boat to the next. With the addition of
premium materials and a thoroughly proven design, a high quality
product is easily achieved.
If runabouts are all about "go fast, look good, have fun" the Sea
Ray 200 Select is well designed and equipped for the task. The boat at
Lake Union Sea Ray was equipped with the optional 5.0 liter (305 cid)
multi-port injected Mercruiser and an Alpha I outdrive. Sea Ray reports
that with this propulsion combination, a clean bottom, and a stainless
steel prop, the 200 Select will reach 50 mph at WOT, 4950 RPM. Nobody
wants to run an engine that hard for more than brief periods, but
speeds should still be in the 35 mph range with the boat backed down to
2/3 throttle. Wakeboarding, recreational water skiing, or just zipping
across the lake or down the sound fast enough to be exciting is all
within easy reach for owners of a Sea Ray 200 Select. Go fast? Check.
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but one would need to be
legally blind not to appreciate that the Sea Ray 200 Select meets some
extremely high standards in the "looking good" category. The lines
are snappy, imparting a confident and slightly aggressive demeanor to
the profile. The high-quality stainless hardware, almost totally
perfect and mirror-smooth robot applied gelcoat, and high quality
interior surfaces are blended together with bold hull graphics and
upholstery inserts that make the 200 Select look like a fast boat when
it's standing still. Pearl is the standard hull color for the Select
series, accented with silver graphics. The boat we inspected at Lake
Union Sea Ray was finished with in a sporty red and white two-tone,
with red gelcoat between the waterline and the stylishly curved rub
rail. (Very nice). Additional gel coat color options include green,
blue, yellow, black, and a bronze called "pewter". A 200 Select
will draw appreciative glances from nearly all, and envious admiration
from a group of boaters who will be making a series of mental
comparisons between the 200 Select and the boats they currently own.
Look good? Absolutely
Like any boat, the Sea Ray 200 Select won't score well in the "have
fun" category until there are some people aboard. The skipper and his
or her passengers will have a blast aboard a 200 Select, as Sea Ray has
incorporated a number of premium features in an ergonomically excellent
environment. The seating forward of the windshield is accessed through
a hinged section of the stainless steel frame and a central
companionway below.
When the forward seats are not in use, a folding door can be secured
across the companionway to prevent wind from blowing under the
windshield and onto the helm seats. Sea Ray built an anchor locker into
the bow of the 200 Select, included large storage areas below the
forward seats, added grab rails just exactly where they will be most
helpful, provided courtesy lighting for sure footing after dark, and
used some nicely upholstered, comfortable cushions. There are no
"cheap seats" on a Sea Ray 200 Select.
Aft of the windshield in the cockpit, the helm is to starboard. A
deluxe helm seat with a flip up bolster will allow the skipper to sit a
bit higher, or even stand at the helm with some support. SmartCraft
(tm) instruments and indicators include fuel level, oil pressure,
coolant temperature, voltmeter, speedometer, tachometer, overheat or
low oil pressure alarms, depth sounder, fuel consumption meter, trim
level, and a trolling control. The wood grain tilt wheel is power
assisted, with a tilt function. Sea Ray has demonstrated an
appreciation for the importance of a comfortable, well organized helm.
At the port watch seat, there is a locker designed to hold a bag of ice
as well as several cans or bottles or refreshing beverages. Cupholders
on the 200 Select are stainless steel.
Listening to music can be an important element when having fun on the
water, and the 200 Select is equipped with an AM/FM/CD stereo system,
protected from the elements in a compartment above the ice locker. The
stereo system is Sirius (tm) satellite capable, and includes a remote
control at the helm.
Additional cockpit seating includes a curved settee just forward of the
engine compartment, and the engine compartment is covered with a thick,
comfortable cushion for ideal for sunbathing. In the standard layout,
(on display at Lake Union Sea Ray), a single seat with a removable
cushion is situated in the aft port quarter of the cockpit. Passengers
stepping aboard the 200 Select can remove the cushion and step on a
non-skid deck surface below, thereby eliminating the need to step
directly on upholstered surfaces when boarding or disembarking.
Fun? You betcha!
Sea Ray offers many additional, useful options for the Sea Ray 200
Select. Boaters particularly passionate about wakeboarding might want
to ad a jaunty-looking stainless wakeboard tower. Family boaters hoping
to extend the season beyond the warm, sunny months might consider the
"camper canvas" option to convert the open cockpit into an enclosed
compartment.
The Sea Ray 200 Select will paint smiles across the faces of any
boaters primarily interested in looking good, going fast, and having
fun. Boats like this are the "sports cars" of the water. Even
though Sea Ray is one of the elite trademarks, it's possible to own a
very, very nice boat for no more than what an increasing number of
families are spending for to acquire a new car. According to Bob Walker
at Lake Union Sea Ray, a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select, with trailer,
will sell "in the mid-30's".
Go fast, look good, have fun? Runabout enthusiasts should consider
making a fast trip to the nearest Sea Ray dealer, taking a good look at
the 200 Select, and preparing to have one heck of a lot of fun.
John Jay
2005-06-18 00:37:06 UTC
Permalink
JimH,
Boat builders normally don't pay for fluff pieces, but they only buy ad
space in magazines that write fluff pieces for their boats. It is quid pro
quo. If Gould did want to write a critical boat review his boss would not
publish it, so why waste his time. Gould writes the reviews to please the
publisher, his editor and the builder.
Post by *JimH*
What were the downsides of the boat Chuck? Surely there had to be some.
Why did you not include them in your fluff article about the boat?
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
Post by c***@gmail.com
At the Ramp, July 6 2005
Sea Ray 200 Select
(Go fast, look good, have fun!)
Some of the most successful boats are vessels with a clear purpose. A
commercial tug has a specific task to perform, just as surely as a
fireboat, a purse seiner, an America's Cup racer, or a ferry boat.
Some recreational vessels have easily identified missions, with most
people thinking of a trawler for long range cruising, a sportfisherman
for offshore angling, a cabin cruiser for vacation gunkholing, etc. One
class of boat, the runabout, is strictly intended to go fast, look
good, and create opportunities for fun on the water. Sea Ray is one of
the premiere, benchmark, brand names in the runabout category. (Easily
verified by strolling through a boat show and overhearing competing
salespeople assure prospects that "Brand X is just as good as a Sea
Ray!")
Seas Ray offers four series in its Sport Boat division. The "Sport"
series boats are nominally 18-20 feet in length, offering a basic, high
quality, but relatively affordable choice. The "Select" boats are
nominally 20-29 feet long, and include several upgrades in standard
equipment that would be optional or not available on the "Sport"
series. The "Sundeck" series, (20-27 feet) are well-equipped boats
with enclosed heads, while the "Weekender" series (22-25 feet)
offers a V-berth as well as a head.
The 200 Select is actually 21' LOA, with an 8'5" beam. Draft with
the drive unit down is 37", but that drops to just 20" with the
drive unit up to facilitate easier loading and unloading at a boat
ramp. Sea Ray lists the "dry weight" of the 200 Select at 3,550
pounds, so it won't require a Kenworth to haul it around. Fuel
capacity is 37-gallons, which should be sufficient for a long, active,
afternoon of waterski or wakeboard runs or up to an entire weekend of
slowpoke exploring and fishing.
We got an up-close look at a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select at Lake Union
Sea Ray's Seattle showroom on Westlake Avenue. Sales Manager Bob
Walker hosted us during our visit there. (Thanks, Bob).
The 200 Select hull features a 20-degree deadrise to provide some of
the seakeeping characteristics of a "deep-V" bottom. There is a
sequence of flat strakes between the keel and the chines. The strakes
provide some additional lifting surface to get the 200 Select more
quickly up on plane, and also provide some specific support points that
increase lateral stability and decrease the likelihood of chine walk.
Seating is available in the open bow section, in pilot and port watch
seats, and on a seat immediately forward of the engine compartment. The
200 Select is rated for up to 8 persons weighing a total of no more
than 1100 pounds, or a 1200-pound maximum load with gear.
Sea Ray boats are built by one of the most highly automated processes
in the industry. Gelcoats are applied to molds by specialized robots,
the hull structure created by a computer controlled application process
known as RIMFIRE (Robotic In-Mold Fiber Reinforcement) and molded
fiberglass components produced by Sea Ray's ZIP (Zero Injection
Pressure) process. Workmanship can be the most radical variable in
manufacturing, and the computerized robotics assure that workmanship is
extremely consistent from one boat to the next. With the addition of
premium materials and a thoroughly proven design, a high quality
product is easily achieved.
If runabouts are all about "go fast, look good, have fun" the Sea
Ray 200 Select is well designed and equipped for the task. The boat at
Lake Union Sea Ray was equipped with the optional 5.0 liter (305 cid)
multi-port injected Mercruiser and an Alpha I outdrive. Sea Ray reports
that with this propulsion combination, a clean bottom, and a stainless
steel prop, the 200 Select will reach 50 mph at WOT, 4950 RPM. Nobody
wants to run an engine that hard for more than brief periods, but
speeds should still be in the 35 mph range with the boat backed down to
2/3 throttle. Wakeboarding, recreational water skiing, or just zipping
across the lake or down the sound fast enough to be exciting is all
within easy reach for owners of a Sea Ray 200 Select. Go fast? Check.
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but one would need to be
legally blind not to appreciate that the Sea Ray 200 Select meets some
extremely high standards in the "looking good" category. The lines
are snappy, imparting a confident and slightly aggressive demeanor to
the profile. The high-quality stainless hardware, almost totally
perfect and mirror-smooth robot applied gelcoat, and high quality
interior surfaces are blended together with bold hull graphics and
upholstery inserts that make the 200 Select look like a fast boat when
it's standing still. Pearl is the standard hull color for the Select
series, accented with silver graphics. The boat we inspected at Lake
Union Sea Ray was finished with in a sporty red and white two-tone,
with red gelcoat between the waterline and the stylishly curved rub
rail. (Very nice). Additional gel coat color options include green,
blue, yellow, black, and a bronze called "pewter". A 200 Select
will draw appreciative glances from nearly all, and envious admiration
from a group of boaters who will be making a series of mental
comparisons between the 200 Select and the boats they currently own.
Look good? Absolutely
Like any boat, the Sea Ray 200 Select won't score well in the "have
fun" category until there are some people aboard. The skipper and his
or her passengers will have a blast aboard a 200 Select, as Sea Ray has
incorporated a number of premium features in an ergonomically excellent
environment. The seating forward of the windshield is accessed through
a hinged section of the stainless steel frame and a central
companionway below.
When the forward seats are not in use, a folding door can be secured
across the companionway to prevent wind from blowing under the
windshield and onto the helm seats. Sea Ray built an anchor locker into
the bow of the 200 Select, included large storage areas below the
forward seats, added grab rails just exactly where they will be most
helpful, provided courtesy lighting for sure footing after dark, and
used some nicely upholstered, comfortable cushions. There are no
"cheap seats" on a Sea Ray 200 Select.
Aft of the windshield in the cockpit, the helm is to starboard. A
deluxe helm seat with a flip up bolster will allow the skipper to sit a
bit higher, or even stand at the helm with some support. SmartCraft
(tm) instruments and indicators include fuel level, oil pressure,
coolant temperature, voltmeter, speedometer, tachometer, overheat or
low oil pressure alarms, depth sounder, fuel consumption meter, trim
level, and a trolling control. The wood grain tilt wheel is power
assisted, with a tilt function. Sea Ray has demonstrated an
appreciation for the importance of a comfortable, well organized helm.
At the port watch seat, there is a locker designed to hold a bag of ice
as well as several cans or bottles or refreshing beverages. Cupholders
on the 200 Select are stainless steel.
Listening to music can be an important element when having fun on the
water, and the 200 Select is equipped with an AM/FM/CD stereo system,
protected from the elements in a compartment above the ice locker. The
stereo system is Sirius (tm) satellite capable, and includes a remote
control at the helm.
Additional cockpit seating includes a curved settee just forward of the
engine compartment, and the engine compartment is covered with a thick,
comfortable cushion for ideal for sunbathing. In the standard layout,
(on display at Lake Union Sea Ray), a single seat with a removable
cushion is situated in the aft port quarter of the cockpit. Passengers
stepping aboard the 200 Select can remove the cushion and step on a
non-skid deck surface below, thereby eliminating the need to step
directly on upholstered surfaces when boarding or disembarking.
Fun? You betcha!
Sea Ray offers many additional, useful options for the Sea Ray 200
Select. Boaters particularly passionate about wakeboarding might want
to ad a jaunty-looking stainless wakeboard tower. Family boaters hoping
to extend the season beyond the warm, sunny months might consider the
"camper canvas" option to convert the open cockpit into an enclosed
compartment.
The Sea Ray 200 Select will paint smiles across the faces of any
boaters primarily interested in looking good, going fast, and having
fun. Boats like this are the "sports cars" of the water. Even
though Sea Ray is one of the elite trademarks, it's possible to own a
very, very nice boat for no more than what an increasing number of
families are spending for to acquire a new car. According to Bob Walker
at Lake Union Sea Ray, a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select, with trailer,
will sell "in the mid-30's".
Go fast, look good, have fun? Runabout enthusiasts should consider
making a fast trip to the nearest Sea Ray dealer, taking a good look at
the 200 Select, and preparing to have one heck of a lot of fun.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 00:44:01 UTC
Permalink
And he has obviously sold his soul and bought into the "I own a SeaRay, look
at me" club. See our earlier posts in this thread.
Post by John Jay
JimH,
Boat builders normally don't pay for fluff pieces, but they only buy ad
space in magazines that write fluff pieces for their boats. It is quid
pro quo. If Gould did want to write a critical boat review his boss
would not publish it, so why waste his time. Gould writes the reviews to
please the publisher, his editor and the builder.
Post by *JimH*
What were the downsides of the boat Chuck? Surely there had to be some.
Why did you not include them in your fluff article about the boat?
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
Post by c***@gmail.com
At the Ramp, July 6 2005
Sea Ray 200 Select
(Go fast, look good, have fun!)
Some of the most successful boats are vessels with a clear purpose. A
commercial tug has a specific task to perform, just as surely as a
fireboat, a purse seiner, an America's Cup racer, or a ferry boat.
Some recreational vessels have easily identified missions, with most
people thinking of a trawler for long range cruising, a sportfisherman
for offshore angling, a cabin cruiser for vacation gunkholing, etc. One
class of boat, the runabout, is strictly intended to go fast, look
good, and create opportunities for fun on the water. Sea Ray is one of
the premiere, benchmark, brand names in the runabout category. (Easily
verified by strolling through a boat show and overhearing competing
salespeople assure prospects that "Brand X is just as good as a Sea
Ray!")
Seas Ray offers four series in its Sport Boat division. The "Sport"
series boats are nominally 18-20 feet in length, offering a basic, high
quality, but relatively affordable choice. The "Select" boats are
nominally 20-29 feet long, and include several upgrades in standard
equipment that would be optional or not available on the "Sport"
series. The "Sundeck" series, (20-27 feet) are well-equipped boats
with enclosed heads, while the "Weekender" series (22-25 feet)
offers a V-berth as well as a head.
The 200 Select is actually 21' LOA, with an 8'5" beam. Draft with
the drive unit down is 37", but that drops to just 20" with the
drive unit up to facilitate easier loading and unloading at a boat
ramp. Sea Ray lists the "dry weight" of the 200 Select at 3,550
pounds, so it won't require a Kenworth to haul it around. Fuel
capacity is 37-gallons, which should be sufficient for a long, active,
afternoon of waterski or wakeboard runs or up to an entire weekend of
slowpoke exploring and fishing.
We got an up-close look at a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select at Lake Union
Sea Ray's Seattle showroom on Westlake Avenue. Sales Manager Bob
Walker hosted us during our visit there. (Thanks, Bob).
The 200 Select hull features a 20-degree deadrise to provide some of
the seakeeping characteristics of a "deep-V" bottom. There is a
sequence of flat strakes between the keel and the chines. The strakes
provide some additional lifting surface to get the 200 Select more
quickly up on plane, and also provide some specific support points that
increase lateral stability and decrease the likelihood of chine walk.
Seating is available in the open bow section, in pilot and port watch
seats, and on a seat immediately forward of the engine compartment. The
200 Select is rated for up to 8 persons weighing a total of no more
than 1100 pounds, or a 1200-pound maximum load with gear.
Sea Ray boats are built by one of the most highly automated processes
in the industry. Gelcoats are applied to molds by specialized robots,
the hull structure created by a computer controlled application process
known as RIMFIRE (Robotic In-Mold Fiber Reinforcement) and molded
fiberglass components produced by Sea Ray's ZIP (Zero Injection
Pressure) process. Workmanship can be the most radical variable in
manufacturing, and the computerized robotics assure that workmanship is
extremely consistent from one boat to the next. With the addition of
premium materials and a thoroughly proven design, a high quality
product is easily achieved.
If runabouts are all about "go fast, look good, have fun" the Sea
Ray 200 Select is well designed and equipped for the task. The boat at
Lake Union Sea Ray was equipped with the optional 5.0 liter (305 cid)
multi-port injected Mercruiser and an Alpha I outdrive. Sea Ray reports
that with this propulsion combination, a clean bottom, and a stainless
steel prop, the 200 Select will reach 50 mph at WOT, 4950 RPM. Nobody
wants to run an engine that hard for more than brief periods, but
speeds should still be in the 35 mph range with the boat backed down to
2/3 throttle. Wakeboarding, recreational water skiing, or just zipping
across the lake or down the sound fast enough to be exciting is all
within easy reach for owners of a Sea Ray 200 Select. Go fast? Check.
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but one would need to be
legally blind not to appreciate that the Sea Ray 200 Select meets some
extremely high standards in the "looking good" category. The lines
are snappy, imparting a confident and slightly aggressive demeanor to
the profile. The high-quality stainless hardware, almost totally
perfect and mirror-smooth robot applied gelcoat, and high quality
interior surfaces are blended together with bold hull graphics and
upholstery inserts that make the 200 Select look like a fast boat when
it's standing still. Pearl is the standard hull color for the Select
series, accented with silver graphics. The boat we inspected at Lake
Union Sea Ray was finished with in a sporty red and white two-tone,
with red gelcoat between the waterline and the stylishly curved rub
rail. (Very nice). Additional gel coat color options include green,
blue, yellow, black, and a bronze called "pewter". A 200 Select
will draw appreciative glances from nearly all, and envious admiration
from a group of boaters who will be making a series of mental
comparisons between the 200 Select and the boats they currently own.
Look good? Absolutely
Like any boat, the Sea Ray 200 Select won't score well in the "have
fun" category until there are some people aboard. The skipper and his
or her passengers will have a blast aboard a 200 Select, as Sea Ray has
incorporated a number of premium features in an ergonomically excellent
environment. The seating forward of the windshield is accessed through
a hinged section of the stainless steel frame and a central
companionway below.
When the forward seats are not in use, a folding door can be secured
across the companionway to prevent wind from blowing under the
windshield and onto the helm seats. Sea Ray built an anchor locker into
the bow of the 200 Select, included large storage areas below the
forward seats, added grab rails just exactly where they will be most
helpful, provided courtesy lighting for sure footing after dark, and
used some nicely upholstered, comfortable cushions. There are no
"cheap seats" on a Sea Ray 200 Select.
Aft of the windshield in the cockpit, the helm is to starboard. A
deluxe helm seat with a flip up bolster will allow the skipper to sit a
bit higher, or even stand at the helm with some support. SmartCraft
(tm) instruments and indicators include fuel level, oil pressure,
coolant temperature, voltmeter, speedometer, tachometer, overheat or
low oil pressure alarms, depth sounder, fuel consumption meter, trim
level, and a trolling control. The wood grain tilt wheel is power
assisted, with a tilt function. Sea Ray has demonstrated an
appreciation for the importance of a comfortable, well organized helm.
At the port watch seat, there is a locker designed to hold a bag of ice
as well as several cans or bottles or refreshing beverages. Cupholders
on the 200 Select are stainless steel.
Listening to music can be an important element when having fun on the
water, and the 200 Select is equipped with an AM/FM/CD stereo system,
protected from the elements in a compartment above the ice locker. The
stereo system is Sirius (tm) satellite capable, and includes a remote
control at the helm.
Additional cockpit seating includes a curved settee just forward of the
engine compartment, and the engine compartment is covered with a thick,
comfortable cushion for ideal for sunbathing. In the standard layout,
(on display at Lake Union Sea Ray), a single seat with a removable
cushion is situated in the aft port quarter of the cockpit. Passengers
stepping aboard the 200 Select can remove the cushion and step on a
non-skid deck surface below, thereby eliminating the need to step
directly on upholstered surfaces when boarding or disembarking.
Fun? You betcha!
Sea Ray offers many additional, useful options for the Sea Ray 200
Select. Boaters particularly passionate about wakeboarding might want
to ad a jaunty-looking stainless wakeboard tower. Family boaters hoping
to extend the season beyond the warm, sunny months might consider the
"camper canvas" option to convert the open cockpit into an enclosed
compartment.
The Sea Ray 200 Select will paint smiles across the faces of any
boaters primarily interested in looking good, going fast, and having
fun. Boats like this are the "sports cars" of the water. Even
though Sea Ray is one of the elite trademarks, it's possible to own a
very, very nice boat for no more than what an increasing number of
families are spending for to acquire a new car. According to Bob Walker
at Lake Union Sea Ray, a brand new Sea Ray 200 Select, with trailer,
will sell "in the mid-30's".
Go fast, look good, have fun? Runabout enthusiasts should consider
making a fast trip to the nearest Sea Ray dealer, taking a good look at
the 200 Select, and preparing to have one heck of a lot of fun.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 01:03:40 UTC
Permalink
And he has obviously sold his soul and bought into the "I own a SeaRay,
look
at me" club. See our earlier posts in this thread.


**********

ROFLMAO

JimH, when you asked "how much do you get paid for writing a piece like
this and I said that I was picking up my new 55-footer tomorrow.....I
was *kidding*! Until Sea Ray builds a trawler, they won't make my
personal short list- but there are still a lot of features on a boat
like this that people interested in runabout boating would enjoy.

Want to buy a bridge? Good grief.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 01:05:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
And he has obviously sold his soul and bought into the "I own a SeaRay, look
at me" club. See our earlier posts in this thread.
**********
ROFLMAO
JimH, when you asked "how much do you get paid for writing a piece like
this and I said that I was picking up my new 55-footer tomorrow.....I
was *kidding*! Until Sea Ray builds a trawler, they won't make my
personal short list- but there are still a lot of features on a boat
like this that people interested in runabout boating would enjoy.
Want to buy a bridge? Good grief.
If he bought a btidge, it would be to close the gaps between his teeth.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 00:55:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
What were the downsides of the boat Chuck? Surely there had to be some.
Why did you not include them in your fluff article about the boat?
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
Be sure to let us know when you write something worth reading.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 00:57:51 UTC
Permalink
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?

***********************************************

I pick up my new 55-footer tomorrow.

Seriously, JimH, I don't get paid a dime by Sea Ray or any other
manufacturer.

And if you'll notice, it's not a review. It's a description, along some
personal observations, opinions, and impressions. There's no claim that
we measured any sort of performance or got underway in the boat- as we
did neither.

This may come as a real shock to you, but discussing boats and
comparing impressions and opinions about boats (rather than bitchily
harpooning personalities at every turn) is supposed to be what a
boating newsgroup is all about. Too bad for you, of course, as you have
demonstrated little knowledge about boats or boating and the very best
of your extremely rare on-topic advice recently- to a guy trying to
figure out if $1500 was too much to pay for a nearly 30 year old boat,
motor, and trailer in running condition- was to "look it up in NADA."
I'm still grinning over that one.

I know how much it p's you off when somebody posts on topic. Sorry.

But here, please, redeem yourself:

If you disagree with my opinions, impressions, or description of the
Sea Ray 200 Select
please respond with your specific comments related to that boat. ("I
think you're an asshole" won't count). Thanks.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 01:03:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
***********************************************
I pick up my new 55-footer tomorrow.
Seriously, JimH, I don't get paid a dime by Sea Ray or any other
manufacturer.
And if you'll notice, it's not a review. It's a description, along some
personal observations, opinions, and impressions. There's no claim that
we measured any sort of performance or got underway in the boat- as we
did neither.
This may come as a real shock to you, but discussing boats and
comparing impressions and opinions about boats (rather than bitchily
harpooning personalities at every turn) is supposed to be what a
boating newsgroup is all about. Too bad for you, of course, as you have
demonstrated little knowledge about boats or boating and the very best
of your extremely rare on-topic advice recently- to a guy trying to
figure out if $1500 was too much to pay for a nearly 30 year old boat,
motor, and trailer in running condition- was to "look it up in NADA."
I'm still grinning over that one.
I know how much it p's you off when somebody posts on topic. Sorry.
If you disagree with my opinions, impressions, or description of the
Sea Ray 200 Select
please respond with your specific comments related to that boat. ("I
think you're an asshole" won't count). Thanks.
Hertvik hasn't seen a boat in years. The only thing he has that floats
is the cloud of intestinal gas above his head.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 01:17:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
How much did SeaRay pay you for this fluff review?
***********************************************
I pick up my new 55-footer tomorrow.
Seriously, JimH, I don't get paid a dime by Sea Ray or any other
manufacturer.
And if you'll notice, it's not a review. It's a description, along some
personal observations, opinions, and impressions. There's no claim that
we measured any sort of performance or got underway in the boat- as we
did neither.
This may come as a real shock to you, but discussing boats and
comparing impressions and opinions about boats (rather than bitchily
harpooning personalities at every turn) is supposed to be what a
boating newsgroup is all about.
So what were the downsides of the boat and why did you not mention them in
your fluff article? Surely there had to be some.
Post by *JimH*
Too bad for you, of course, as you have
demonstrated little knowledge about boats or boating and the very best
of your extremely rare on-topic advice recently- to a guy trying to
figure out if $1500 was too much to pay for a nearly 30 year old boat,
motor, and trailer in running condition- was to "look it up in NADA."
I'm still grinning over that one.
Where did I say that $1,500 was too much to pay? The boat was close to 20
years old and for all I knew it had a value of $1,000....thus my advice. I
am not nor ever have been a used boat salesmen. You have so you definitely
have a leg up on me.

I have over 25 years of boating and boat ownership on the Great Lakes. If
you have a problem with my knowledge of boats and boating, tough shit
Chuckie.

BTW: My recent *on topic* posts far exceed yours. You have also started
far more *off topic* posts. Want to bet on that Chuck or will you retract
your statement?

Grin away Chuck.
Post by *JimH*
I know how much it p's you off when somebody posts on topic. Sorry.
<grin> Grasping at straws...
Post by *JimH*
If you disagree with my opinions, impressions, or description of the
Sea Ray 200 Select
please respond with your specific comments related to that boat. ("I
think you're an asshole" won't count). Thanks.
I have never been on that boat but if I did I am sure I would find some
positives and some negatives about it...unless of course I was being paid
big bucks to write a fluff article about it.

But hell, I have morals and would never be paid off to do so.

You on the other hand................

BTW: Do you wear gold chains and a speedo Chuck?
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 01:27:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
I have over 25 years of boating and boat ownership on the Great Lakes.
The same year of experience 25 times, tied up to the marina dock, or
driving off a mile for a swim.

Be sure and let us know when you get a boat. Or a life.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 01:41:21 UTC
Permalink
Where did I say that $1,500 was too much to pay? The boat was close to
20
years old and for all I knew it had a value of $1,000....thus my
advice. I
am not nor ever have been a used boat salesmen. You have so you
definitely
have a leg up on me.

*********
You still don't get it. That's even funnier. There's no meaningful
"book value" on a 30 year old boat. The value of a boat like that is
going to be whatever two people agree that it is. There's not much risk
of seriously overpaying for a boat reported in fair or better condition
that floats and runs at $1500. If you knew about boats, you'd know
that. You ought to keep your mouth shut rather than dispense goofy
advice.

Your "25 years of boating experience" sounds more like 90-days
experience repeated 100 times.

******************

JimH wrote:


I have never been on that boat but if I did I am sure I would find some

positives and some negatives about it...unless of course I was being
paid
big bucks to write a fluff article about it.

But hell, I have morals and would never be paid off to do so.


You on the other hand................

**********

So let's get this straight:

You admit you have never been aboard the boat, but you are sure that my
description is so inaccurate that it indicates a lack of basic
morality?

Tell us about your morality: Does it involve arriving at conclusions
about people and statements
without any evidence what-so-ever (as you admit to doing above)? Does
it involve posting endless personal attacks against perfect strangers?
Where did you learn this moral code?

You continue to claim the honor of being among the leading "on-topic"
posters here.
Google is not your friend, at all, in that regard. 90% of your crap is
dedicated to personal attack. Look yourself up and see. The only people
you're fooling with your claim are folks who don't follow your endless
spew of anti-Gould, anti-Krause, anti- (insert names here) drivel.

So, unless you can post something actually related to the boat, your
negative opinion of the boat and your assertion that my description is
"immoral" isn't based on any knowledge of the boat, but rather on your
silly stereotype of Sea Ray owners and your hatred for most of the rest
of mankind (including yours truly). Right?

If you had any reason to hang around a marina, you'd soon meet some Sea
Ray owners and you would know how foolish your stereotype sounds. Most
bashers betray only their own ignorance, rather than any real knowledge
about a product. If you had any shame, you would be embarrassed.
*JimH*
2005-06-18 02:13:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
Where did I say that $1,500 was too much to pay? The boat was close to 20
years old and for all I knew it had a value of $1,000....thus my advice. I
am not nor ever have been a used boat salesmen. You have so you definitely
have a leg up on me.
*********
You still don't get it. That's even funnier. There's no meaningful
"book value" on a 30 year old boat. The value of a boat like that is
going to be whatever two people agree that it is. There's not much risk
of seriously overpaying for a boat reported in fair or better condition
that floats and runs at $1500. If you knew about boats, you'd know
that. You ought to keep your mouth shut rather than dispense goofy
advice.
Fine. You are the only one arguing that fact to give you some sort of
credibility.
Post by *JimH*
Your "25 years of boating experience" sounds more like 90-days
experience repeated 100 times.
More persona attacks Chuck. Apparently you lost this discussion by doing
so.
Post by *JimH*
******************
I have never been on that boat but if I did I am sure I would find some
positives and some negatives about it...unless of course I was being paid
big bucks to write a fluff article about it.
But hell, I have morals and would never be paid off to do so.
You on the other hand................
**********
You admit you have never been aboard the boat, but you are sure that my
description is so inaccurate that it indicates a lack of basic
morality?
Yep. All boats have flaws. You never describe them in your fluff reviews.
A lack of morals...accepting payments from the man to keep it
positive.......yep.
Post by *JimH*
Tell us about your morality: Does it involve arriving at conclusions
about people and statements
without any evidence what-so-ever (as you admit to doing above)? Does
it involve posting endless personal attacks against perfect strangers?
Where did you learn this moral code?
You continue to claim the honor of being among the leading "on-topic"
posters here.
Google is not your friend, at all, in that regard. 90% of your crap is
dedicated to personal attack. Look yourself up and see. The only people
you're fooling with your claim are folks who don't follow your endless
spew of anti-Gould, anti-Krause, anti- (insert names here) drivel.
I believe you are second to Krause on Off Topic posts, somewhere in the
neighborhood of 10,000+.

Now if you can dispute that, in recent months. my on topic posts are
greater than yours please do so. You have relied on century old data.
Post by *JimH*
So, unless you can post something actually related to the boat, your
negative opinion of the boat and your assertion that my description is
"immoral" isn't based on any knowledge of the boat, but rather on your
silly stereotype of Sea Ray owners and your hatred for most of the rest
of mankind (including yours truly). Right?
If you had any reason to hang around a marina, you'd soon meet some Sea
Ray owners and you would know how foolish your stereotype sounds. Most
bashers betray only their own ignorance, rather than any real knowledge
about a product. If you had any shame, you would be embarrass
I have spend many nights at my marinas and have seen many owners of newer
(post 189) SeaRays.

My impression:

1. They generally knew nothing about boats and boat quality (construction
wise) or value

2. They purchased on name recognition.

Your "look at me I own a Searay" review does nothing to negate that.

Have a good night Chuck.
HarryKrause
2005-06-18 02:17:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by *JimH*
I have spend many nights at my marinas
In the bar, no doubt.
--
If it is Bad for Bush,
It is Good for the United States.
ed
2005-06-18 13:40:01 UTC
Permalink
Chuck, great write up, I really enjoy it. Its a shame that others has to
flame write ups like this. My dad use to tell me that people who has to find
anything to complain about are usually not happy with there life. Chuck, as
always I enjoy your writings and I had a chance to ride in my old boss sea
ray, it was a very fast and very nice looking boat. Thanks Again

Ed
Post by *JimH*
Post by *JimH*
Where did I say that $1,500 was too much to pay? The boat was close to 20
years old and for all I knew it had a value of $1,000....thus my advice. I
am not nor ever have been a used boat salesmen. You have so you definitely
have a leg up on me.
*********
You still don't get it. That's even funnier. There's no meaningful
"book value" on a 30 year old boat. The value of a boat like that is
going to be whatever two people agree that it is. There's not much risk
of seriously overpaying for a boat reported in fair or better condition
that floats and runs at $1500. If you knew about boats, you'd know
that. You ought to keep your mouth shut rather than dispense goofy
advice.
Fine. You are the only one arguing that fact to give you some sort of
credibility.
Post by *JimH*
Your "25 years of boating experience" sounds more like 90-days
experience repeated 100 times.
More persona attacks Chuck. Apparently you lost this discussion by doing
so.
Post by *JimH*
******************
I have never been on that boat but if I did I am sure I would find some
positives and some negatives about it...unless of course I was being paid
big bucks to write a fluff article about it.
But hell, I have morals and would never be paid off to do so.
You on the other hand................
**********
You admit you have never been aboard the boat, but you are sure that my
description is so inaccurate that it indicates a lack of basic
morality?
Yep. All boats have flaws. You never describe them in your fluff
reviews. A lack of morals...accepting payments from the man to keep it
positive.......yep.
Post by *JimH*
Tell us about your morality: Does it involve arriving at conclusions
about people and statements
without any evidence what-so-ever (as you admit to doing above)? Does
it involve posting endless personal attacks against perfect strangers?
Where did you learn this moral code?
You continue to claim the honor of being among the leading "on-topic"
posters here.
Google is not your friend, at all, in that regard. 90% of your crap is
dedicated to personal attack. Look yourself up and see. The only people
you're fooling with your claim are folks who don't follow your endless
spew of anti-Gould, anti-Krause, anti- (insert names here) drivel.
I believe you are second to Krause on Off Topic posts, somewhere in the
neighborhood of 10,000+.
Now if you can dispute that, in recent months. my on topic posts are
greater than yours please do so. You have relied on century old data.
Post by *JimH*
So, unless you can post something actually related to the boat, your
negative opinion of the boat and your assertion that my description is
"immoral" isn't based on any knowledge of the boat, but rather on your
silly stereotype of Sea Ray owners and your hatred for most of the rest
of mankind (including yours truly). Right?
If you had any reason to hang around a marina, you'd soon meet some Sea
Ray owners and you would know how foolish your stereotype sounds. Most
bashers betray only their own ignorance, rather than any real knowledge
about a product. If you had any shame, you would be embarrass
I have spend many nights at my marinas and have seen many owners of newer
(post 189) SeaRays.
1. They generally knew nothing about boats and boat quality (construction
wise) or value
2. They purchased on name recognition.
Your "look at me I own a Searay" review does nothing to negate that.
Have a good night Chuck.
c***@gmail.com
2005-06-18 17:12:05 UTC
Permalink
I'm glad you enjoyed the description of the boat, Ed.

In a perfect world, people who disagreed with my comments would express
that disagreement
based on their own personal knowledge or research. I guess the lazy
approach is to just go directly to personal attack, and it works pretty
well for folks with no knowledge upon which to base a factual rebuttal.
My observations about various boats aren't going to be well received
by a couple of folks here, but that doesn't stop me from offering them
for the benefit of folks like yourself who say they enjoy them. (I
don't write any of them specifically for the NG, so there's investment
of additional time to post them here)

.
John Jay
2005-06-18 17:18:01 UTC
Permalink
Chuck,
I find your comments to be as accurate and as well written as any I have
read in any boating magazine. Do you disagree with any statement I made
concerning the quid pro quo relationship between boat builders and boating
magazines?

Don't you believe it is in the best interest of those reading these reviews
and observations to understand that relationship?

I for one hope you keep posting your articles, but let's be honest, they are
PR pieces for the builders, they are not unbiased discussions about the
merits of the boat.
Post by c***@gmail.com
I'm glad you enjoyed the description of the boat, Ed.
In a perfect world, people who disagreed with my comments would express
that disagreement
based on their own personal knowledge or research. I guess the lazy
approach is to just go directly to personal attack, and it works pretty
well for folks with no knowledge upon which to base a factual rebuttal.
My observations about various boats aren't going to be well received
by a couple of folks here, but that doesn't stop me from offering them
for the benefit of folks like yourself who say they enjoy them. (I
don't write any of them specifically for the NG, so there's investment
of additional time to post them here)
.
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...